The Gaits Soundscape 2016

Date & Time

Last event was Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Location

Meet below the High Line at the Gansevoort Street Plaza, on the corner of Gansevoort St. & Washington St.

UPDATE: Advance RSVP for The Gaits Soundscape 2016 is currently closed. On-site registration may be available if space permits.

Celebrate the winter solstice with this one-of-a-kind processional. Your footsteps (and those of others around you) will be turned into a variety of sounds, creating a collective, whimsical music piece. Download the free smartphone app that features the score by Lainie Fefferman, Jascha Narveson, and Cameron Britt.

To join the fun, download the iPhone or Android application and join us starting at 5:00 PM when we'll be registering participants and distributing speakers. Be sure to arrive by 5:30 PM to ensure participation. The walk begins promptly at 6:00 PM on street level below the High Line at Gansevoort and Washington Streets, moves through the park, and ends at West 30th Street.

If you own a small portable speaker, bring it along to use during the soundwalk, or be one of the first 100 participants to arrive at the meeting location to borrow a free, wearable speaker for the duration of the event.

This High Line Program is free and open to visitors of all ages.


ABOUT MAKE MUSIC WINTER

Make Music New York's third annual Make Music Winter features 12 participatory, musical parades throughout New York City on December 21, the first night of winter. Inspired by composer Phil Kline's annual Unsilent Night, which has drawn thousands of participants since its launch in 1992, Make Music Winter includes innovative projects for bells, brass bands, electric guitars, iPhones, percussionists, singers, strings, and more. Like its summer counterpart, Make Music Winter is free, outdoors, and profoundly participatory. All are invited to join in. Details are available at makemusicny.org.

ABOUT THE COMPOSERS
New York composer Lainie Fefferman has written music for voices, orchestral instruments, banjoes, bagpipes, shawms, car parts, and electronic media. Her music draws inspiration from the rigorous, the gorgeous, the nasty, and the zany. She began her studies as a math major, but ended up a composer at Yale and is now working toward a PhD in composition at Princeton. Her recent collaborators include Newspeak, JACK Quartet, So Percussion, and electric guitar quartet Dither. She has sung at the United Nations, been a rehearsal pianist at Westminster Choir College, and performed on kazoo with the Bang on a Can All-Stars.

Jascha Narveson was raised in a concert hall and put to sleep as a child with an old vinyl copy of the Bell Laboratories mainframe computer singing "Bicycle Built for Two." Awash in the sounds of chamber music recitals in his parents' house-concert series from an early age, he spent his high-school years playing in improvisatory un-music bands and listening to increasingly esoteric music from various corners of the globe and subcultural strata of the industrialized world. These influences mixed with intensive traditional training in North and South Indian rhythmic traditions, a summer residency with Bang On A Can, and degrees in acoustic and electronic composition from Wilfrid Laurier University, Wesleyan's MA in experimental and world music, and Princeton's doctoral program. His music is a vibrant testament to these influences, combining the Western composer's love of novelty with an unshakable devotion to rhythm, physicality and "flow" inherited from everywhere else. His music has been played in many places by many people, some of them famous, others deserving of fame, all of them deserving of thanks.

N. Cameron Britt is a percussionist, composer, and instrument builder. He invented the EMvibe, an electromagnetically actuated vibraphone. As a percussionist he has performed extensively with the North Carolina Symphony and is active as a creator and interpreter of new music. His compositions have been performed by the Brentano String Quartet, So Percussion, Ensemble Klang, janus, NOW Ensemble, and the electronica duo Matmos. He has worked with the laptop ensembles Sideband and PLOrk and is interested in creating new electronic instruments in both hardware and software. He received his PhD in Composition from Princeton University and currently teaches percussion at Duke University.

Daniel Iglesia creates music and media for humans, computers, and broad interactions of the two. His works have taken the form of concert works for instruments and electronics, live audio and video performance, generative and interactive installations, and collaborations with many disciplines such as theater and dance. He co-led PLOrk (the Princeton Laptop Orchestra) for three seasons. He plays with Spirograph Agnew and Sideband. He made MobMuPlat. He currently works at Google.


SUPPORT

Public Programs on the High Line are supported by Altman Foundation. These programs are supported, in part, with public funds from the New York City Council, under the leadership of Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito.

Presented in association with Make Music New York.