Architecture

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Author: 
Clay Grable
Photo by Andrew FraszLooking north into the Chelsea Market Passage, the former site of the Nabisco building, at dawn. Photo by Andrew Frasz

First-time High Line visitors may wonder: Does this park run into that building? Does this park go through that building? The High Line does, in fact, run through a handful of buildings. For those who expected their walk to be an exclusively outdoor affair, this impromptu inside view can prove surprising. But what really makes this arrangement so arresting is not the invasion of these buildings’ interiors, but rather those buildings’ accommodation of the High Line.

The truth is that most of these buildings were constructed alongside the High Line specifically to integrate with it. This design allowed the freight trains that ran goods along the High Line to stop in on the second level of these buildings for easy loading and unloading. Originally, many buildings welcomed the High Line inside their loading docks high above the street. Today, the High Line runs through only two buildings that were originally built to host trains: the Cudahy Packing Company building and the National Biscuit Company (Nabisco) building.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The great Ada Louise Huxtable, standard setter for architecture criticism as we know it. Photo by Gene Maggio, via The New York Times
 

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
High Line GingerbreadAn edible High Line made of gingerbread, frosting, and festive winter plants is now on view at Cookshop.
 

Edible High Lines are the new trend this holiday season.

Author: 
Julia Boyer
Categories: 
EnlargeENYA 2010 Winning Entry.

The Emerging New York Architects Committee(ENYA) with AIA New York recently announced the winners of its 4th international competition for High Bridge: Bronx, Building Cultural Infrastructure. The ideas competition was intended to explore urban opportunities and draw awareness to restoring and reopening the historic High Bridge.

ENYA biennial competition challenges designers to explore how disused structures can be reconfigured into vibrant urban centers. Over 170 teams and individuals from all over the world submitted design concepts for New York's High Bridge.



Author: 
Anonymous
At a panel discussion at the Museum of the City of New York last night, planners and community advocates criticized the lack of coordination going into the planning for the West Side.

The sheer mass of public and private development planned for the West Side (between 14th and 42nd Street, West of 8th Avenue) is staggering.  

Besides the Rail Yards themselves, current planning initiatives include:
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