Art

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Art

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Timothy SchenckIsabelle Cornaro's artwork stands amid a canopy of trees and cheery hedgenettle. Photo by Timothy Schenck

The presence of High Line Art’s group exhibition Archeo changes with the seasons. In summer, as lush foliage reaches up, encircles, and even obscures parts of the artworks, the visitor’s experience is almost that of a treasure hunt. Rather than seeing an artwork from a block away, sometimes a pause or slower walking pace is necessary to notice a piece peeking out from the back of a planting bed.

The three sculptures of God Box (column) by French artist Isabelle Cornaro – one of which is pictured here – are both alien and familiar, and both at home and foreign within the High Line’s landscape. One can imagine they are monuments of a futuristic society or that they were dropped here by visitors from another planet. After all, that was High Line Art Curator Cecilia Alemani’s intention.

“On the High Line – where freight trains used to run 30 feet above the street, in a landscape worthy of the futuristic machinations of a science fiction movie – the sculptures presented in Archeo punctuate the landscape in unusual ways, creating a gallery of artifacts from a futuristic past,” Cecilia said at Archeo’s installation earlier this spring.

Download the current High Line Art Map to learn more about all of High Line Art’s current artworks on view.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckAn installation view of Carol Bove's High Line Commission Caterpillar installed on the High Line at the Rail Yards in 2013. Photo by Timothy Schenck.

Friends of the High Line founded High Line Art in 2009 with the opening of the first section of the High Line. The mission of High Line Art is to present a wide array of artwork including site-specific commissions, exhibitions, performances, video programs, and a series of billboard interventions. We invite artists to think of creative ways to engage with the uniqueness of the architecture, history, and design of the High Line and to foster a productive dialogue with the surrounding neighborhood and urban landscape. Since 2011, High Line Art has been curated by Cecilia Alemani. Previously, the program was curated by Lauren Ross.

Since 2009, High Line Art has worked with over 120 artists from around the world, including up-and-coming artists as well as mid-career and established artists. We have presented more than 22 commissions; 21 videos on High Line Channels 14 and 22; 18 billboards; and 14 performances.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckEd Ruscha’s High Line Commission Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today is the artist’s first public art commission in New York City. All photos by Timothy Schenck.
 

Cecilia Alemani, the Donald R. Mullen Jr. Curator & Director of High Line Art talks about legendary artist Ed Ruscha’s first public commission in New York City.

Can you tell us about Ed Ruscha’s commission for the High Line, which opened in early May?
It is the first time that Ed Ruscha is presenting his work in a public space in New York City. The project consists of a large-scale mural painted on the side of an apartment building overlooking the High Line at West 22nd Street. The mural recites “Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today,” and it is a reinterpretation of a 1977 pastel drawing of the same title. The mural is quite large, measuring 30 x 50 feet.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckAn installation view of Marianne Vitale's Common Crossings, part of the group exhibition Archeo. Photo by Timothy Schenck

High Line Art will premiere several new projects this spring as part of its ever-changing public art program, including the outdoor group exhibition Archeo, a new billboard by Faith Ringgold, and a large-scale mural by legendary artist Ed Ruscha.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Vadim KrisyanPhotographer Vadim Krisyan captures the High Line beautifully in black and white. A limited palate highlights Ulla von Brandenburg’s Shadowplay on view daily beginning at 4:00 PM on High Line Channel 14 located in the 14th Street Passage on the High Line.

In this age of highly saturated, full-color imagery, it is refreshing to see the timeless, muted tones of a monochrome image. The starkness of winter lends itself to shades of gray. By using black-and-white, Vadim Krisyan focuses his viewers on shape, light, and subject. Undistracted by color, the eye can take in a scene in a wholly different way. This is especially appropriate when looking at an image of von Brandenburg’s video installation, Shadowplay.

See more of Krisyan’s images of the High Line here, all poetically simplified by the use of a black-and-white lens.

View more of the beautiful work of other visitors and High Line Photographers – and share your own – in the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Two visitors enjoy a morning stroll despite the rain. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Photographer Timothy Schenck captured this vibrant autumn photo this morning as a light rain fell on the Chelsea neighborhood. Peering out from between the trees in the 10th Avenue Square, on the High Line at West 17th Street, Tim’s photo captures a north-facing view of the park’s fall foliage and our newest High Line Billboard at West 18th Street.

Contrasting with the overcast day, Thomas Demand’s new High Line Billboard installation, High Line, offers an unwavering bright patch of blue sky next to the park. This seemingly simple poetic image of an empty clothesline is actually a photograph of a meticulously constructed paper and cardboard replica of these everyday objects.

The large billboard format, which High Line Art Curator & Director Cecilia Alemani has used to augment the presence and impact of artworks, creates an interesting interaction with park goers and sparks the imagination. Clotheslines are both familiar and exotic – in the sense that they are recognizable, but don’t quite fit into our 21st-century city-dwelling existence. (Maybe a more Manhattan-centric version could involve quarter slots or a drop-off laundry reference?)

However you choose to interpret and enjoy the new High Line Billboard, it’s not a bad thing to be reminded of a summer breeze on an idyllic countryside, especially on rainy days like today. Stop by soon – this High Line Billboard will be on view until Monday, December 2, 2013.

Author: 
Kat Widing
Basim Magdy, Time Laughs Back at You Like a Sunken Ship, 2012. (Video Still) Super 8 film transferred to HD video. 9 min. 31 sec. Courtesy Newman Popiashvili Gallery.
 

Help fuel the artistic energy on the High Line this month with our weekly #SolarPanel! Organized in conjunction with High Line Art's curated video series, Solar, on view now at High Line Channel 14, we are facilitating a Q&A session between High Line Art Curator & Director, Cecilia Alemani, and the artists – Rosa Barba, Camille Henrot, Basim Magdy, and Neïl Beloufa – over High Line Art's Twitter account, @HighLineArtNYC. The Twitter conversations will occur in four installments, featuring one artist per week. The artists’ fascinating answers will offer a unique perspective into the inspiration, process, and themes manifest in their work. The following day, we will post the full interviews (packed with even more juicy information) on the High Line Art's Tumblr blog.

Read more after the break.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Steven SeveringhausThose eyes! Gilbert & George's Waking keeps a close watch on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

Waking (1984), the prismatic High Line Billboard by artists Gilbert & George, draws the eye like a magnet. However, unlike most billboards vying for your gaze on any given day in New York City, this one gazes back.

Such a captivating work of art was bound to inspire photographers, and Waking began to appear frequently in our Flickr pool. We found these shots by Steven Severinghaus particularly striking.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Gilbert & George, Waking. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

The High Line Art Billboard is back in action, sporting Gilbert & George’s Waking (1984) next to the High Line at West 18th Street. With luminous colors and thick black outlined figures, the semi-mirrored composition of faces and bodies recalls the look of a stained glass window. Gilbert & George stand confidently in the center of the billboard, with their hands clasped in front of them, surrounded by mask-like faces and a line-up of young men. Taken together with the title, the scene suggests a sort of inner awakening in the passage from boyhood to manhood supported by the inclusion of various age groups.

Read more after the break.

Author: 
Kat Widing
The artist (bottom center) installing her High Line Commission Untitled. Photo by Friends of the High Line.
 

With less than a month left to see Virginia Overton’s beloved pickup truck before it says its goodbyes, we thought this was a perfect time to spotlight Overton’s High Line Commission in relation to her prolific career.

Read more after the break.

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