Art

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Art

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeUpdate! Submission deadline for the ArtBridge 2010/2011 Exhibition extended to July 16.
 

Sometimes it seems like every street in New York City has one or two buildings with scaffolding bridging the sidewalk.

Sure, those boxy, plywood scaffolds and sidewalk sheds are there to protect pedestrians from overhead construction or dangerous facades, but they can be an eyesore.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeThe Chelsea Grasslands as imagined with Wandering Band musicians. Original Photo By Rik Panganiban and Adapted By Sebastien Sanz de Santamaria.
 

Because the High Line was designed to be an open space for all people to enjoy, and because art, in general, makes our brains happy, we're looking forward to introducing you this weekend to Ana Prvacki's "Wandering Band."

Author: 
Julia Boyer
EnlargePatrick Cullina, Friends of the High Line
Vice President of Horticulture & Park
Operations.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Tiber Chair

One of the hallmarks of successful urban spaces all over the world is the use of movable chairs. William Whyte’s studies in The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces found that people create ownership of public space by being able to control where and how they sit. This theory was recently tested in Times Square, where the moveable chairs in the new pedestrian plaza have proven to be enormously popular.

But will the same application work in Italy? That’s what Friends of the High Line Co-Founder Robert Hammond will soon find out.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeThe High Line at Gansevoort and Washington Streets, next door to the site of the Whitney Museum's planned expansion. Photo By Iwan Baan.
 

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Categories: 
pipeA still from "Passage of Two," shot on the High Line at the rail yards, part of the film "NY Export: Opus Jazz."
 
Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Categories: 
pipePeter Colquhoun's Under the Standard on the High Line.
 

The High Line is increasingly becoming a place of inspiration for art-making. One of the most recent works comes from Peter Colquoun, whose landscapes of the High Line are on view right now at DietzSpace.

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