Asters

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Author: 
Adam Dooling
Photo by Friends of the High LineBluebird smooth aster is a magnet for monarch butterflies and other pollinators. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Asters are one of the iconic flowers you see at the High Line in the fall. Raydon’s Favorite aromatic aster is a cultivar that produces prolific purple and yellow blooms that shouldn’t be missed. Photo by Patrick Cullina
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Under The Standard, New YorkTartarian aster is just one of the many varieties of aster you’ll find in bloom at the High Line this season. The plants’ distinctive lavender blooms are a sure sign that autumn has arrived at the park.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Categories: 
pipeAs summer finally fades into autumn, the High Line will be transformed with a new season of horticultural features.
Northern Spur Preserve thanks to the Christy and John Mack Foundation. Photo by Steven Cohen
 

Autumn is one of our favorite seasons on the High Line, and a time when many of the species planted here come into their own.

Author: 
admin
Categories: 
asterPhoto by Bryan Hou, via Flickr
 

Happy December!

Author: 
admin
flowersVia Josiah Lau's Flickr
 

If the 5:00 darkness is making you want to crawl into bed until April, it may be time for a walk on the High Line, where the colorful blooms and fall foliage are still going strong!

Author: 
admin
aster
 

Last week, Kaspar Wittlinger (one of the High Line's gardeners, hailing all the way from Muenster, Germany – like the cheese!) showed me an interesting phenomenon happening right now: the lighting fixtures on the High Line are confusing the aromatic aster.

You'll notice in the picture above that the bright, purple blooms cover only part of the plant.  That's because aromatic aster (Aster oblongifolius) is a variety of wildflower that depends on short days and low light, and the lighting fixture installed on the rail has caused the plant to receive a seasonally abnormal amount of light.  On the rail side of the plant, it's still June!

[More photos after the jump.]

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