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Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Timothy SchenckOur newest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood, photographed by Timothy Schenck

High Line Photographer Timothy Schenck perfectly captured our latest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood in an aerial image, allowing us to see how this monumental work of art appears at a distance. The lofty viewpoint showcases the scale of the billboard in relation to the High Line, as well as how the work's bright colors interact with the muted shades of the winter landscape. Schenck has taken photographs of High Line Art's projects for years, and his documentation of the program's sculptures, billboards, and other works of art allows us to appreciate them in a whole new way.

Author: 
Kat Widing

Want to carry around a unique piece of art with you wherever you go? You’re in luck! High Line Art has launched a series of one-of-a-kind High Line Billboard tote bags, which were created from decommissioned works in the High Line Billboard series. And, as an added bonus, they’re eco-friendly. The billboards were treated with plant-based cleaners before being pieced and constructed into each custom-designed tote bag, making every single recycled bag a unique creation.

Read more after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Two visitors enjoy a morning stroll despite the rain. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Photographer Timothy Schenck captured this vibrant autumn photo this morning as a light rain fell on the Chelsea neighborhood. Peering out from between the trees in the 10th Avenue Square, on the High Line at West 17th Street, Tim’s photo captures a north-facing view of the park’s fall foliage and our newest High Line Billboard at West 18th Street.

Contrasting with the overcast day, Thomas Demand’s new High Line Billboard installation, High Line, offers an unwavering bright patch of blue sky next to the park. This seemingly simple poetic image of an empty clothesline is actually a photograph of a meticulously constructed paper and cardboard replica of these everyday objects.

The large billboard format, which High Line Art Curator & Director Cecilia Alemani has used to augment the presence and impact of artworks, creates an interesting interaction with park goers and sparks the imagination. Clotheslines are both familiar and exotic – in the sense that they are recognizable, but don’t quite fit into our 21st-century city-dwelling existence. (Maybe a more Manhattan-centric version could involve quarter slots or a drop-off laundry reference?)

However you choose to interpret and enjoy the new High Line Billboard, it’s not a bad thing to be reminded of a summer breeze on an idyllic countryside, especially on rainy days like today. Stop by soon – this High Line Billboard will be on view until Monday, December 2, 2013.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Steven SeveringhausThose eyes! Gilbert & George's Waking keeps a close watch on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

Waking (1984), the prismatic High Line Billboard by artists Gilbert & George, draws the eye like a magnet. However, unlike most billboards vying for your gaze on any given day in New York City, this one gazes back.

Such a captivating work of art was bound to inspire photographers, and Waking began to appear frequently in our Flickr pool. We found these shots by Steven Severinghaus particularly striking.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Gilbert & George, Waking. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

The High Line Art Billboard is back in action, sporting Gilbert & George’s Waking (1984) next to the High Line at West 18th Street. With luminous colors and thick black outlined figures, the semi-mirrored composition of faces and bodies recalls the look of a stained glass window. Gilbert & George stand confidently in the center of the billboard, with their hands clasped in front of them, surrounded by mask-like faces and a line-up of young men. Taken together with the title, the scene suggests a sort of inner awakening in the passage from boyhood to manhood supported by the inclusion of various age groups.

Read more after the break.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Raymond Pettibon, No Title (Safe he called...), 2013. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York / London.
 

You only have a few more days to see artist Raymond Pettibon’s High Line Billboard No Title (Safe he called…), on view next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue. A work from his famous series of baseball drawings, Pettibon’s piece depicts the movements and dynamism of a game between the Boston Red Sox and the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
 

Visit the High Line in December and you may be surprised to see two zebras peering out from a billboard at West 18th Street. This month, High Line Art presents a new HIGH LINE BILLBOARD commission, Untitled (zebras), by artist Paola Pivi.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Evenings offer an opportunity to experience the park and the surrounding cityscape in a unique way. Photo by Liz Ligon
 

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Elad Lassry, Women (065, 055), 2012. Part of HIGH LINE BILLBOARD. Installation view, Edison Properties, West 18th Street at 10th Avenue, New York. On view August 1 – September 7, 2012. Photo: Austin Kennedy. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line..
 

Wednesday morning we braved the rain to install the latest artwork on HIGH LINE BILLBOARD, our High Line Art series of installations on the 25-by-75 foot billboard next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue.

It’s a new work by Los Angeles-based artist Elad Lassry titled Women (065, 055). The work features two young women, both dressed alike, gazing out of two small portholes into a sea of green. Detached from any visual history or context, the image is both mesmerizing and elusive. It highlights the very act of observing and being observed and allows visitors to create their own conceptual space and visual context for the image.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle

On May 31st the corner of West 18th Street and 10th Avenue received a colorful new addition to the Edison Properties billboard. Untitled is the latest edition on HIGH LINE BILLBOARD, a series of commissions by High Line Art for the large billboard next to the park at West 18th Street. It was installed by acclaimed Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan and photographer Pierpaolo Ferrari, the artists behind the photography magazine Toilet Paper.

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