Birds

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Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Steven SeveringhausA mockingbird enjoys the "berries" – actually cones – of one of the High Line's Emerald Sentinel® Eastern red cedar trees. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Orrin Sheehan
Photo by Steven SeveringhausThis hungry sparrow doesn't mind the astringent taste of the Viking black chokeberry. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A red-breasted American robin perches on historic rail tracks along the High Line. Photo by Juan Valentin

The signs of spring are all around us at the High Line. Trees are budding and new spring blooms are popping up daily. And, if you look carefully, there is also a renewed flurry of feathered activity returning to the park.

High Line Photographer Juan Valentin captured this photo of an American robin, Turdus migratorius, during a visit this past weekend. Most American robins migrate to warmer climates in the winter, literally flocking to Florida and Mexico, and then return north in the early spring to breed. You may catch these early risers pulling up worms from lawns, eating berries, and gathering twigs or grass for their nests.

Even if the birds are out of sight, you may recognize their distinctive call which is characterized as cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up – a nice reminder that sunnier spring days are coming soon.

Learn more about other birds you may see at the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Peregrine falcons are just one of the many birds that you may be surprised to see at the High Line. Photo by Annik La Farge.
 

The High Line’s plantings are not only beautiful – they provide a year-round oasis for both local and migratory birds. From wooded areas that are good for nesting, to dried seed heads left intact over the winter that offer a source of food during the cold season, the High Line is a natural habitat for urban birds.

In this series of blog posts, we’ll be joined by High Line Gardener and resident naturalist Maryanne Stubbs, for a closer look at the birds you’ll find at the High Line.

Learn more about the High Line’s year-long winged residents after the jump.

Author: 
admin
Categories: 
flowersRescued American Woodcock.
 

This fancy bird, a migratory American Woodcock, was rescued by High Line gardener and bird enthusiast Maryanne on Friday. It was found huddled in a doorway on West 20th Street, stunned but not visibly injured -- she guessed the little guy had flown into the side of a building and had been knocked to the ground.

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