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Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargeLongtime High Line Photographer Marcin Wichary chanced upon this poetic early morning scene in the winter of 2010.

In celebration of the High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

This month’s image comes from longtime High Line Photographer Marcin Wichary. Marcin may call San Francisco home, but the course of his development as a photographer can be charted via almost-yearly visits to the High Line. Beginning in 2007 with a newly purchased DSLR and continuing through the present, Marcin has developed his photo skills while focusing his lens on the development and growth of the park.

It was during a short stint in New York in the winter of 2010 that Marcin captured this month’s mesmerizing image. Awaking in the morning to find fluffy snowflakes falling along the mile-long park was a welcome change of scenery for Marcin. As he was rushing to get out the door to document the snowfall, he spotted this scene almost serendipitously.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Categories: 
Photo by Barry MungerA beautiful winter landscape. Photo by Barry Munger

In celebration of the High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

This month’s image comes from photographer Barry Munger. Barry has been lending his talents to Friends of the High Line since long before our 2009 opening. With his over-sized film camera set-up, immeasurable patience, and a keen eye, Barry has coaxed some of the most poetic photos out of what can sometimes be an unwieldy landscape. You may remember another iconic shot by Barry that we featured as our September calendar image .

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargeWest Side Improvement Project

In celebration of our new 18-month High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

In 1934, the initial stage of the West Side Improvement Project was completed: a shining new elevated viaduct was unveiled, connecting New York Central Railroad’s freight line with Manhattan’s West Side. This great engineering achievement eliminated 105 street-level railroad crossings and allowed manufacturing and food processing buildings flanking the railway to connect directly with its train cars to load and unload freight.

At the southern terminus of the High Line was a new St. John’s Park Freight Terminal at Spring Street. This massive new building allowed for 150 standing train cars, a leap ahead to support increasing manufacturing demands on the neighborhood’s businesses.

This month’s photo, at right, appeared in a 1934 promotional brochure detailing the West Side Improvement Project. Looking north along the new – and to-date unused – tracks of the High Line, anticipation was building for the debut of the new elevated railways. New York Central Railroad wrote about the project in their brochure:

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto of the High Line by Steven Severinghaus

In celebration of our new 18-month High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

October’s calendar image is a vibrant autumn landscape shot by High Line Photographer Steven Severinghaus. This image was taken during one of our seasonal photo walks, informal meet-ups Friends of the High Line leads with our volunteer photographers. On that early morning in October last year, a small group of us met up at the south end of the High Line at the top of the Gansevoort Stair and set out into the park with our cameras. The weather was brisk and fall foliage was in full-swing. Steven’s photo beautifully captures a short section of park between West 19th and West 20th Streets. In the foreground, the light purple blooms of Raydon’s Favorite asters contrast against the yellowing wispy strands of threadleaf bluestar and red-tinged Shennendoah switchgrass.

Steven is one of a small, dedicated group of photographer volunteers who lend their talents to the High Line, turning their lenses to a variety of subjects in the park. He has an impressive talent for discovering subtle details and textures that easily go unseen to most people. Browsing his Flickr Photostream is guaranteed to brighten your day. There you’ll find hummingbirds alighting delicate branches, poetically composed portraits of seasonal blooms, and a variety of the teeniest fauna you’ll ever find in New York City’s natural spaces.

We are endlessly impressed by and delighted with Steven’s work, and we’re sure you will be too. Join us after the jump to get to know him better.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto of the High Line by Iwan Baan

In celebration of our new 18-month High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

Photographer Barry Munger captured this dreamy shot of the High Line at the Rail Yards in the summer of 2007, nearly two years before the first section of the park would open to the public. Barry has been a longtime supporter and friend of the park, often focusing his keen eye and old-school film cameras on a variety of High Line subjects.

In 2007, when this photo was taken, construction was underway on the first two sections of the High Line from Gansevoort to West 30th Streets. Section 1 of the park, running from Gansevoort to West 20th Streets, would open to the public nearly two years later, and Section 2 would open a year after that. Yet, in 2007, there was still uncertainty surrounding the High Line at the Rail Yards. It wasn’t clear whether the full vision of the High Line could be realized and this last half-mile stretch saved and transformed into public space. It would be over five years before the future of this final piece of the High Line would be secured.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto of the High Line by Iwan Baan

In celebration of our new 18-month High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

Renowned architectural photographer Iwan Baan captured this iconic High Line aerial photograph around the time of the opening of the second section of the High Line in June 2011. Iwan photographs many of the most prominent architectural projects in the world, often turning his lens to subjects in New York. (You may also recognize him as the photographer behind the shocking New York magazine cover image of a half-dark cityscape following Hurricane Sandy.)

Iwan’s photo on this warm June evening encapsulates not only a moment in the High Line’s history, but a moment in New York City’s history. Below are a few of the “timestamps” visible in this photo:

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