Community Engagement

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Author: 
Emily Pinkowitz
Photo by Rowa LeeTeen staff reflect on that day's work with High Line Educator Gahl Shottan. Photo by Rowa Lee

On June 26, Friends of the High Line will celebrate the graduation of the Green Corps class of 2014 with a Garden Party. In anticipation of this year’s program coming to an end, Green Corps Leaders Beatrice Ramos and Winona Holderbaum have chosen five important moments from the year to highlight.

Author: 
Emily Pinkowitz
Photo by Rowa Lee High Line Educator Karen Lew Biney-Amissah makes history fun for a group of students. Photo by Rowa Lee

Long before the High Line was a forgone conclusion, Friends of the High Line staff learned a valuable lesson about the power of programming from our very first landlords. In 2002, Josh David and Robert Hammond opened the first Friends of the High Line offices in the Hudson Guild. Offering a combination of cultural and educational programming and social services, the Guild is a vital hub for local residents, and builds lasting relationships throughout their lives.

EnlargeThese girls are among the 14,388 people who have participated in High Line Education programs since 2009. Photo by Beverly Israely

Over the years, the Guild has served as a teacher and partner in responsive programming that welcomes local residents and serves their needs and interests. In 2006, Friends of the High Line's former Special Projects Manager, Meredith Taylor, created our first after-school program with children from the Guild. In 2009, former Director of Public Programs, Education & Community Engagement, Danya Sherman, worked with the Guild to hire teens from their PowerUP program as our first Youth Corps staff. And in 2010, Danya’s collaboration with Guild staff led to the creation of ¡Arriba!, a live Latin music night that has attracted more than 6,500 people over the last four years.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto by Friends of the High Line

Earlier this week High Line staff, Summer Youth Corps, and Teen Arts Council members were thrilled to host a series of activities as part of our neighborhood's National Night Out, an afternoon and evening of festivities organized by the PSA4 Community Council, Fulton Houses Tenant Association, and Fulton Youth of the Future. National Night Out involves 15,000 communities across the United States and Canada, and even military bases abroad, with a goal of promoting safe communities and neighborhood camaraderie.

Read more and see more photos after the jump.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Photo by Tom Kletecka.

Later this season, Danya Sherman, our Director of Public Programs, Education & Community Engagement, will be moving on from Friends of the High Line to pursue a graduate degree in urban planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston.

Though she will stay with us through June to help transition her successor, we want to take a moment to reflect on her positive impact and share our personal experience working with her.

Follow us after the jump for photos and anecdotes from the High Line community.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
It’s alternative spring break week at the High Line. Pictured here are the teens participating in this year’s High Line Green Corps, an education and job-training program by Friends of the High Line. Photo by Beverly Israely

Sixteen-year-old Winona Kay Holderbaum was amazed the first time she visited the High Line. “As a little girl, I used to pass by the overgrown bridge with my father, and I always wondered why no one could go up there,” she says.

Winona is one of ten teens selected from among 90 applicants for this year’s Green Corps program. Since January, the teens have been spending their afternoons at the High Line, earning a paycheck and receiving valuable job experience in fields like urban ecology, horticulture, and sustainability. This week is the teens’ spring break, and they’ve been working daily at the park, helping the High Line Gardeners and High Line Educators complete Spring Cutback.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photos by (left and upper right) Rowa Lee and (lower right) Juan Valentin
 

It’s been a busy couple of weeks for the High Line. We’ve been so busy with recovery from Hurricane Sandy that we haven’t yet had a chance to share photos and stories from our favorite fall community event: Haunted High Line Halloween.

On Saturday, October 27, hundreds of families brought their Halloween spirit to the High Line for a spooky scavenger hunt, tasty treats, a dress-up photo booth, a pop-up pumpkin patch, face painting, live jazz and swing music, and more.

Join us after the jump for more photos and details about the event.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
High Line TalksPumpkins, spiders, and spooky skeletons adorn the engine of the High Line Ghost Train, a giant puppet made by local public school students. Photo by Joan Garvin
 
EnlargeBoo

Later today, we’re joining local elementary school students from Public Schools 3, 11, and 33 for the second annual Halloween Parade on the High Line.

Leading the spooky procession will be the High Line Ghost Train, a giant puppet made by the students over the past month as part of the High Line Teaching Artist Halloween Program, an education initiative sponsored by AT&T.

Follow us after the jump for to learn more and view photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Pick up a copy from one of the stands along 10th Avenue, or follow us after the jump to read the article. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Last month we introduced you to Erycka Montoya Perez, our new Community Engagement Manager at Friends of the High Line. One of our favorite local newspapers, Chelsea Now, recently spoke with Erycka about her experience thus far and her plans for the High Line.

Follow us after the jump to read the article, watch a short video, and see photos from recent community engagement activities.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The Teen Picks Film Committee brought together a group of local teens who conceived of and planned a three-screening film series from start to finish. Photo by Daniella Zalcman
 

This special blog post comes to you from Luz Delma Adon, Raquel Rosado, Liza Rosado, and Juwan Stone, who, with Hahillah Ahmed, Brian Bass, Gabrielle (Gabby) Bruno, Carla Hernández, Winona Holderbaum, and Javier Montero served as members of the High Line Teen Film Committee. Together, these local teens worked with staff at Friends of the High Line to curate and produce a free summer film series, called High Line Teen Picks, which took place over the course of three weeks in August, thanks in part to support from AT&T.

Over the course of this project, we were asked many times, “Why did you choose these movies for the film series?”

The High Line itself is a reinvention, built by people who didn’t give up. Teen Picks consisted of different types of movies – a romance, an action flick, and a drama – but even though they differ from one another, each one relates to the High Line. Each movie features underdog characters who never give up on their beliefs and dreams, and that is what the High Line is all about. The High Line was going to be knocked down, but since people believed in it and wanted to make something of it, they fought for it, and today it remains standing.

When we set out to curate Teen Picks, our first task was to select three movies that fit our theme. We started with a selection of 20 movies, but we had to narrow it down. After three months of reviewing the films, we got the list down to the final four: Step Up, The Notebook, Real Steel, and Freedom Writers.

Four movies for only three film screenings. Weird right?

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