Community Input

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
presentationThe news marks an important point in the history of the High Line. This elevated railway viaduct, originally built in 1934 to carry freight trains, is now entirely owned by the City of New York and poised to be fully transformed into a one-of-a-kind public space. Photo by Barry Munger
 

We have exciting news to share with you.

The City of New York has acquired the title to the third and final section of the High Line from CSX Transportation, Inc. The transfer of ownership paves the way to begin construction so that the last stretch can open to the public one day soon.

Follow us after the jump to read about what this means for the High Line.
Author: 
Kate Lindquist
 

Since the very beginning, community input has played an important role in shaping the development of the High Line. This tradition continues today.

More than 400 neighbors, supporters, members, and friends attended the High Line at the Rail Yards Community Input Meeting on Monday, March 12 to see a presentation by James Corner and Ric Scofidio, of the High Line Design Team. The meeting gave our community the opportunity to be among the first to see the initial design concepts for the rail yards and to share their feedback directly with the designers.

Follow us after the jump for photos from the meeting and a summary of the public’s comments.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
presentationHigh Line at the Rail Yards Community Meeting in December, 2011. Photo by Yoon Kim
 
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We asked. You told us. Now the fun begins.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


It’s a familiar experience for those who have recently visited the High Line. Standing at the northernmost point of the park, you look through the metal construction fence and see the still undeveloped stretch of the historic freight rail structure. You ask yourself, “What is happening out there? Will this be open to the public?”

Here is your chance to find out.

Join us at the High Line at the Rail Yards Community Input Meeting on Tuesday, December 6 at 6:30 PM to get an update on the third and final section of the High Line.

Author: 
Anonymous

HYCAC, an official community coalition made up of members of Community Board 4, local electeds and community organizations, has written a letter to MTA CEO Lee Sander with its reaction to the five proposals.

Author: 
Anonymous
CB4

Manhattan Community Board 4 and HYCAC developed this document to synthesize information about the MTA's guidelines for the rail yards site, as well as overviews of the five proposals. It was intended for discussion at the December 10 public forum, but serves as a good reference for comparing the plans side-by-side.

Download the PDF (Be patient: It's 9MB)
Author: 
Anonymous
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Friday is the last day of the public exhibition of all five developer proposals, in a storefront near Grand Central. The exhibition includes design boards, models, and last time we checked, a representative from each developer on hand to answer questions. Those details again:
Author: 
Anonymous
Community Meeting

On Monday night, over 200 interested members of the community (as well as political figures such as New York State Senator Tom Duane) gathered at the Hudson Guild at an event sponsored by Community Board 4 and the Hudson Yards Community Advocacy Coalition that included presentations from the five developers who have submitted plans for the rail yards. After the presentations, attendees had the opportunity to break into small groups to discuss the plans and give their feedback in a formal way.

Photos of the event can be found here

CB4 prepared a handy info sheet (PDF) comparing each plan by the numbers. A summary from the community discussion will be available soon.

The developers' presentations were short and business-like, as they labored mightily to conform to a time limit of ten minutes per proposal. That was still plenty of time for lots of shiny pictures (and in the case of the Durst/Vornado plan, a snappy video), as well as for some revealing rhetorical moments. A brief digest after the jump.

Author: 
Anonymous
Rail Yards Blog is developing a set of five questions to ask each developer about their proposals for the rail yards site.


We want to hear from you: what would you most like to ask the developers?

The five questions will be posted on Rail Yards Blog next week.

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