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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
This special High Line Live! performance turned the High Line at Little West 13th Street into an open theater at sunset. Photo by Julienne Schaer
 

This week we kicked off High Line Live! – our new program series that brings live theater, performance, and music to the park, thanks to the generous support of MetLife Foundation. More than 150 people joined us on Thursday, June 7 for the Hudson Guild Theater Company debut of their new production, The Sleeping Beauty on the High Line, a contemporary dance adaptation of Tchaikovsky’s classic The Sleeping Beauty. The performance coincided with the first anniversary of the opening of Section 2, making it an extra special occasion to gather with some of our closest neighbors.

Matthew Westerby choreographed the modern dance piece, which featured dancers of all ages and experience levels – many from our own community. The performance was produced by Jim Furlong, Director of Arts at Hudson Guild, a multi-service community center serving those who live, work, or go to school in Chelsea, with a focus on those in need. The Sleeping Beauty is one of many public programs we’ve presented at the High Line in partnership with Hudson Guild.

Join us after the jump to see more photos from The Sleeping Beauty on the High Line.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
 

Since the very beginning, community input has played an important role in shaping the development of the High Line. This tradition continues today.

More than 400 neighbors, supporters, members, and friends attended the High Line at the Rail Yards Community Input Meeting on Monday, March 12 to see a presentation by James Corner and Ric Scofidio, of the High Line Design Team. The meeting gave our community the opportunity to be among the first to see the initial design concepts for the rail yards and to share their feedback directly with the designers.

Follow us after the jump for photos from the meeting and a summary of the public’s comments.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Work continues as our staff and volunteers move north, trimming back plant material to make way for spring growth. Photo by Annik La Farge.
 

We have just completed our fourth week of High Line Spring Cutback.

Spring Cutback is an intense six-week-long undertaking that involves trimming back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. It’s our biggest horticultural task of the year and High Line Gardeners couldn’t do it without the help of a dedicated group of volunteers.

Stop by the park and see the transformation underway, and follow us after the jump for an update on our recent work.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The rail yards section will extend the High Line’s distinctive design vocabulary established south of West 30th Street, evoking the High Line’s history as an active freight rail line, and the unique self-seeded landscape that grew up between the tracks when the trains stopped running in the 1980s.
 

Last night we unveiled the initial design concepts for the rail yards section of the High Line at a community input meeting at Public School 11 in Chelsea.

More than 400 neighbors, supporters, members, and friends turned out to listen to James Corner and Ric Scofidio, of the High Line Design Team, present their concepts, share their feedback, and ask questions.

The never-before-seen images represent the first vision for the High Line’s unique landscape at the rail yards, which is still overgrown with wildflowers and grasses that grew up between the tracks when the trains stopped running in the 1980s.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and view the designs.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
High Line Gardeners are busily working to cut back more than 100,000 plants by hand to prepare for new spring growth on the High Line. The process, called High Line Spring Cutback, began this week.
 

This week we begin High Line Spring Cutback – our biggest horticultural task of the year.

Visit the High Line over the next six weeks, and you’ll see High Line Gardeners busily working with teams of volunteers to cut back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. With each cut they make, you will start to see new green shoots and early spring bulbs emerge.

This morning we invited volunteers, supporters, and local teens from the NYC Lab School for Collaborative Studies to take part in a ceremonial cutting to mark the launch. Follow us after the jump to learn more and view photos.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
An illustration by designer and author Vahram Muratyan comparing the Promenade Plantée, or Coulée Verte, and the High Line. The illustration is part of his new book, Paris vs. New York: A Tally of Two Cities. Image courtesy of the author and Penguin Books.
 

Paris and New York — two cultural centers an ocean apart have a friendly rivalry that’s older than time. Whether you prefer shopping the Champs Elysées or 5th Avenue, spending a rainy day reading Le Temps Retrouvé or The Catcher in the Rye, or snacking on a macaron or a cupcake — you will appreciate designer Vahram Muratyan’s witty side-by-sides of these two iconic cities.

Vahram’s comparisons of Paris and New York, and the Promenade Plantée and the High Line, give us yet another reason to celebrate the Parisian park for its inspiration. Here we take a closer look of at the High Line’s predecessor.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Hyemi Cho’s portraits peek out of the windows of neighboring apartment buildings and playfully engage High Line visitors. Photo by Meg Kinney.
 

High Line visitors are often surprised to see smiling faces gazing back at them, and even waving, from the windows of neighboring buildings toward the northern terminus of the park. After the initial double-take, it’s easy to realize that these amusing locals are not flesh-and-blood people, but rather a playful ruse.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
presentationHigh Line at the Rail Yards Community Meeting in December, 2011. Photo by Yoon Kim
 
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We asked. You told us. Now the fun begins.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Senator Tom Duane, here with Chelsea Garden Club members in front of a volunteer's handiwork at 25th & Ninth Avenue, championed the pit gardens and got the green light to plant in the bike-lane tree pits.Senator Tom Duane, here with Chelsea Garden Club members in front of a volunteer's handiwork at 25th & Ninth Avenue, championed the pit gardens and got the green light to plant in the bike-lane tree pits.
 

We would like to give a shout out to our friends at the Chelsea Garden Club.

These hard-working volunteers have adopted the tree pits along 8th and 9th Avenues and transformed them into mini-gardens filled with beautiful flowers, grasses, and shrubs.

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