congestion

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Michelle Sharkey
rain
 

Today's blog post was guest written by one of our new Greeters, Claudia Berger.
Today I was on the High Line for its first morning in operation. I was very impressed by how determined people were to see it– not even the rain could stop them. Visitors braved the rain, but none of them felt it wasn't worth it. The morning attracted not only die-hard fans of the High Line, but some curious opponents. However, even in the rain, they could not help but enjoy it. One visitor told me she was determined to hate the High Line, but spent her time up there in awe. She loved it, rain and all.


Author: 
Danya Sherman
The High Line is well on its way to becoming New York's first park in the sky, with plants taking root in late summer and the first section on schedule to open by the end of 2008. Keep up to date with the High Line's progress here on the Blog, written by Friends of the High Line's staff members:

Design!

Author: 
Anonymous
Enlarge

It's not too late to join us and Alex Feleppa, director of horticulture for the Horticultural Society of New York, for a naturalist walk on the rail yards section of the High Line. The walks are this Saturday, June 7 (there are three sessions.)

Author: 
meredithatthehi...
pointing
 

Yesterday, Jeff and I had the honor of judging the Second Annual High Line Design Competition at the Lab School in Chelsea.  The competition is the culmination of a multi-week geometry unit in two of Ms. Rodriguez and Ms. Whelan's math and science classes that uses the High Line as a model for teaching the students about scale, ratio, and area.  All of the student's designs for the High Line had to be to scale, incorporate native plants and grasses, and honor High Line planning principals.

More photos after the jump.


Author: 
Danya Sherman
Enlargehigh line sketch

... And so can you! There are still a few spots remaining for the remaining Sketching the High Line classes with artist Ann DeVere.

Last Saturday was the first class, and it was a really wonderful experience. Ann led us through a series of warm-up exercises to get our creative juices flowing, and then we sat for few longer sketches, observing and recording the unique viewpoint we had of the High Line and its surroundings.

Don't miss this great opportunity!

There are spaces available for the following dates: May 10, May 17, and May 31; click here to sign up. All classes begin at 11 am and end at 12:30 pm. These classes are identical, so registration is only permitted for one class. Members receive a discount; click here for more information about becoming a member. More photos after the jump.


Author: 
meredithatthehi...
 

Last week, a group of twenty Tiffany & Co. employees removed their jewelry and donned gardening gloves to clean up trash on the rail yards section of the High Line in anticipation of our High Line sketching classes which starts this weekend.  The employees are all part of TIffany 's TeamBuilders Manhattan, a group of staffers that get together for volunteer projects and social activities.  Departments from across the company were represented, including the corporate office and the Wall Street and Fifth Avenue retail stores.  The all-female crew broke up into three smaller groups and tackled different sections of the High Line between 30th-34th Street, filling nearly 25 bags with trash in just an hour and a half.  The bags were then removed by a Parks Department sanitation team.

Author: 
joshatthehighline
Categories: 

The handsomest factories and warehouses around the High Line got a kiss from the city on March 18, when the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) calendered a proposal for a new industrial historic district in West Chelsea.  When the LPC calendars a proposal, it has a high chance of being approved.  The hearing is scheduled for May 13.  Read the LPC's statement about the district after the jump.

EnlargeCourtesy NYC Landmarks
Preservation Commission.

There are many people and groups who've helped make this happen, most notably New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who provided crucial leadership on this initiative, as she has done on so many other important projects in our neighborhood (including the High Line!).  State Senator Tom Duane also championed the effort, as did the Society of the Architecture of the City.  That said, the historic district was originally the brainchild of a longtime Chelsea resident and Community Board 4 member, Ed Kirkland.  Ed has been pushing for this historic district for years -- it's one of many ways this dedicated preservationist and tireless community activist has worked to ensure that the most valuable historic resources of our community are maintained.

We're excited about this district, because it joins the High Line's preservation in demonstrating the importance of preserving industrial architecture and infrastructure.  Some of the buildings in the district are among our favorites in the High Line neighborhood, including the Starrett-Lehigh Building, the New York Terminal Warehouse Company's Central Stores, and many others.

west chelseaThe Otis Elevator Building, built in 1911-1912, is one of the buildings in the proposed West Chelsea Historic District.
Photo courtesy NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission.
 

Other buildings in the proposed district include: the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Freight Warehouse; the RC Williams Warehouse; the Cornell Iron Works, and the Reynolds Metal Company.

Read the LPC's statement about the district after the jump.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - congestion