Construction

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeThe Seating Steps and Lawn will be a central gathering spot when Section 2 opens in the spring.
 

Crews have finished rolling out the sod on what will be the High Line's first lawn—a 4,900 square foot swath of inviting turf in Section 2.

The Lawn is located between West 22nd and West 23rd Streets, where the High Line opens up to a wider area that once housed an extra track that served a loading deck for the adjacent warehouse.

In recent weeks, the High Line's contractors have installed sod in this central gathering spot. The sod is comprised of a mix of varied grasses that is more tolerant of heavy use, foot traffic, heat, and shade than a typical lawn.

When Section 2 opens in the spring, visitors will find that the Lawn "peels-up" at the northern end, offering an elevated vantage point from which to view the city skyline to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Check out more photos after the jump.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeThe Viewing Spur's painted steel frame has arrived. Next, crews will install the glass guardrail, viewing platform, and wood benches.
 

If you are walking near 10th Avenue and West 26th Street, look up and you will notice a new addition to the High Line. The Viewing Spur is starting to take shape.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeAmerican holly trees (Ilex opaca) were lifted onto the High Line, where they are being planted in the Chelsea Thicket.
Chelsea Thicket South in memory of Janice H. Levin.
 

Earlier this morning, American holly trees (Ilex opaca) — the first trees to be planted in Section 2 — were lifted from the street onto the High Line near West 21st Street.

Author: 
Julia Boyer
Categories: 
pipePhotograph by Tim Schenck
 

We love this shot by Tim Schenck of Silman Associates, the High Line’s structural engineering firm. It shows the progress, and the context, of the new access point at 30th Street, what will be the northernmost point of Section 2.

Author: 
Julia Boyer
Categories: 
Waterproofing the final sections between 20th and 22nd Streets.
 

This afternoon, our crews are finishing waterproofing work on the southernmost part of the High Line's Section 2, near 20th Street. Waterproofing the top layer of screed concrete will prevent standing rainwater and damage to the structural steel and concrete. It will also prevent swamp-like conditions in the planting beds after a heavy rain, which can lead to mold and rot.

Author: 
admin
Categories: 
pipeWorkers pour screed concrete over a layer of wire mesh. Photo by Tim Schenck.
 

Section 2 construction is on a roll!

If you visit the park and peer through the chain-link fence at 20th Street, you'll notice some work happening on the surface of the High Line in the blocks to the north. The construction team has installed wire mesh above the lower (structural) concrete surface.  The mesh provides bonding, flexibility, and additional strength to a 2" - 3" layer of "screed concrete" on the deck. This screed concrete will then be waterproofed, and the landscape installed on top.

Author: 
admin
Categories: 
cut outNew space for the 30th Street Entrance.
Photo by Patrick Cullina.
 

The latest on the High Line's next section: the construction team recently removed FOURTEEN TONS of steel up at 30th Street to make way for the future stairs and elevator.

When Section 2 opens, 30th Street will be the northernmost access point on the High Line, at least until the Rail Yards section is built.  The entrance is located right at "the curve", where the High Line begins its iconic sweep westward towards the Hudson River.

Like the stairs at Gansevoort Street and 14th Street, the 30th Street stairs will cut through the structure, bringing visitors face-to-face with the High Line's steel beams and rivets. Click through for a rendering.


Author: 
admin

Dear Friends,

2009 has been a remarkable year for the High Line. After spending the spring working on the final stages of construction, we opened the first section of the park in June. Since then, we estimate that nearly 2 million people have visited. We hope you were among these first visitors to the High Line, and that you return again and again in 2010.

The High Line's first year as a public park has been truly amazing. We've pulled together some of our favorite pictures from this incredible, historic year. We hope you enjoy them!

We hope you'll continue to support the High Line as we prepare for 2010.

Many thanks, and happy New Year,


signature
 

2009
 

Park visitors stroll and relax on the Diller von Furstenberg Sundeck between 14th and 15th Streets. The Sundeck is one of the High Line's most popular gathering spots, especially for sunbathers on bright summer days, and as a place to watch the sunset. Photo by Iwan Baan

"...The High Line is a hit, and not just with tourists but with New Yorkers who are openly relishing a place where they can reflect and relax enough to get a new perspective on Manhattan."
– Diane Cardwell, For High Line Visitors, Park is a Railway Out of Manhattan, New York Times

Author: 
admin

In addition to all the shoveling the High Line staff did to keep the park open this weekend, our temporary Maintenance & Operations facility has been moved down to the southern entrance of the High Line, at street level. In order to get ready for the joining of Section 1 to Section 2 (still under construction) the M&O trailers (where our gardeners, maintenance workers, and Rangers house equipment and offices) were moved 10 blocks south, just west of the Gansevoort Stairway.

trailerM&O container being lifted off of the 20th Street location and moved to ground level
at Gansevoort & Washington Streets. Photo by Jenny Staley.
 

The trailers and containers were crane-lifted off the High Line and loaded onto flatbed trucks that transported everything to their new southern location, where they will rest until construction for the new Whitney Museum begins at Gansevoort and Washington Street, adjacent to the High Line.

trailerContainer being set down into its new location just west of the Gansevoort Entrance.
Photo by Jenny Staley.
 
Author: 
admin
Categories: 
constructionThe pathway system's substructure at 28th Street, ready to be planked.
 

Even on frigid days like last Friday, with icy winds whipping off the Hudson, our construction team is busy at work building the landscape on Section 2 (20th Street to 30th Street). For weeks now, the team has been laying the substructure for the High Line's planking system. It's a painstaking process which involves endless measuring and leveling with a series of tiny shims to make sure the path lies completely flat despite the imperfect surface of the underlying concrete.

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