Design

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist


Designers, architects, engineers, and planning nerds like us will appreciate A.O. Scott’s review of Gary Hustwit’s new film, Urbanized in today’s New York Times.

“Like a really good class taught by a team of enthusiastic professors, Urbanized supplies grist for many late-night arguments or solitary ruminations. It is worth venturing out of your room, climbing on your bike or boarding a low-emissions bus and fighting your way through a crowd to see.”

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Worker PlantingCrews recently installed more than 8,000 plants in the beds under the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover, a dense woodland area in Section 2. Here, a crew member plants Densiflora lilyturf (Liriope muscari 'Densiflora'), an evergreen groundcover. Photo by Tim Schneck
 

Now that the weather has warmed up and the soil has thawed, landscape crews are back at work, installing perennials and grasses in the planting beds throughout Section 2.

Follow us after the jump for more photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
viewing-platform-arrives
 

At the northern terminus of Section 2, construction crews recently hoisted a 15-by-35-foot steel frame into place. The frame is a key component of the Viewing Platform above the 30th Street Cut-Out, an area where the High Line’s concrete decking has been removed, revealing the steel gridwork of High Line beams and girders. The 30th Street Cut-Out will be one of the unique design features visitors find when Section 2 opens later this spring. 30th Street Cut-Out, thanks to The Pershing Square Foundation.

Follow us after the jump for more photos and renderings.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
piet-oudolf-winterWinter on the High Line is a wonderful time of year to experience Piet Oudolf's vision for the park's planting beds. Photo Courtesty of Piet Oudolf
 

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
seating-steps-largeLocated at West 22nd Street, the Seating Steps will be a central gathering space when Section 2 opens in the spring.
 

Between the recent snowstorms, crews have been working through the icy temperatures and frigid winds to install the Seating Steps – an elevated seating area near the Lawn in Section 2.

Follow us after the jump for more coverage and photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeThe Seating Steps and Lawn will be a central gathering spot when Section 2 opens in the spring.
 

Crews have finished rolling out the sod on what will be the High Line's first lawn—a 4,900 square foot swath of inviting turf in Section 2.

The Lawn is located between West 22nd and West 23rd Streets, where the High Line opens up to a wider area that once housed an extra track that served a loading deck for the adjacent warehouse.

In recent weeks, the High Line's contractors have installed sod in this central gathering spot. The sod is comprised of a mix of varied grasses that is more tolerant of heavy use, foot traffic, heat, and shade than a typical lawn.

When Section 2 opens in the spring, visitors will find that the Lawn "peels-up" at the northern end, offering an elevated vantage point from which to view the city skyline to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

Check out more photos after the jump.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeCarol Levitt's second grade class at the Village Community School used the High Line to study a number of topics this past spring. One element was this structure, which the class constructed as a model of the structure in its current use as a public park.
 

The High Line is more than place for strolling and enjoying city views—the park's gardens, design, and history are excellent tools for teaching people of all ages. This is especially true for Carol Levitt, a 2nd grade teacher at the Village Community School in the West Village.

Carol saw the High Line as a means of teaching her students about the life-cycle of plants, our city's industrial history, and the importance of community participation. After bringing her students on fields trips with Emily Pinkowitz, our School & Youth Program Manager, Carol's students asked to build a giant model of the High Line in their classroom. Using building blocks, cardboard, construction paper, aluminum foil, plastic, and other found materials, they created a model that takes a look at what the High Line once was, and what it is today.

The students' careful attention to detail shines through in their final result. The model included architectural design features, like the 10th Avenue Square, and prominent neighborhood landmarks near the park, like The Standard Hotel and Pastis. It even featured a garden that used live plants, pebbles, and popsicle-stick railroad tracks to recreate the way the High Line looked when the trains stopped running.

"The children in my group feel as if the High Line somehow belongs to them," Carol says, "They joyfully take their parents, grandparents, and friends of all ages to the High Line and tell them the story. The children followed the approval of the Rail Yards with cheers. How extraordinary that they studied the High Line as it grew and will continue to grow. They see themselves as being the future of the High Line—which they will indeed be."

The photos tell the full story. Follow us after the jump for a tour of their project.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Tiber Chair

One of the hallmarks of successful urban spaces all over the world is the use of movable chairs. William Whyte’s studies in The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces found that people create ownership of public space by being able to control where and how they sit. This theory was recently tested in Times Square, where the moveable chairs in the new pedestrian plaza have proven to be enormously popular.

But will the same application work in Italy? That’s what Friends of the High Line Co-Founder Robert Hammond will soon find out.

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