Green-Up

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
High Line Gardeners and volunteers work to clear leaf litter and dried grasses from the High Line’s planting beds near Little West 12th Street. Photo by Liz Ligon

We have just completed the first week of High Line Spring Cutback!

The High Line’s plants are not trimmed back at the onset of cold weather in the fall. Instead the landscape is left intact to provide structure, beauty, and habitat throughout the winter. As spring arrives, Friends of the High Line staff and volunteers work together to cut back the plants to make way for new green growth. This horticultural effort, called High Line Spring Cutback, takes place throughout the entire month of March.

See more photos from our first week of Spring Cutback after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
L'Arte del Gelato's frozen treats combine a variety of high-quality ingredients including the recent addition of milk from Battenkill Valley Creamery. Photos: top by Lou Manna, courtesy of L'Arte del Gelato; bottom courtesy of Battenkill Valley Creamery.
 

High Line Food is committed to working with entrepreneurial food partners whose products are good for the people eating the food, good for those who grow it, and good for the land. With this core philosophy in mind, we were thrilled when returning food partner L’Arte del Gelato decided to make the switch to locally-sourced milk for their full-range of gelati on offer at the High Line.

This new sustainably-produced New York State milk from Battenkill Valley Creamery is a great addition to their already impressive roster of high quality ingredients.

“Italians know that the secret to good food is to step back and let the ingredients speak for themselves!” L’Arte del Gelato co-founder Francesco Realmuto says. “Using Battenkill Valley Creamery milk for all of our High Line gelati is a great way to showcase delicious local food from right here in New York State.”

Learn more about the family farm supplying L’Arte del Gelato’s milk after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Peregrine falcons are just one of the many birds that you may be surprised to see at the High Line. Photo by Annik La Farge.
 

The High Line’s plantings are not only beautiful – they provide a year-round oasis for both local and migratory birds. From wooded areas that are good for nesting, to dried seed heads left intact over the winter that offer a source of food during the cold season, the High Line is a natural habitat for urban birds.

In this series of blog posts, we’ll be joined by High Line Gardener and resident naturalist Maryanne Stubbs, for a closer look at the birds you’ll find at the High Line.

Learn more about the High Line’s year-long winged residents after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Sicilian honey garlic, Allium siculum subspecies dioscoridis, is one of the many alliums that’s popping up in the High Line’s planting beds.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Beneath the concrete planks and beautiful plantings is an advanced system for water drainage and retention. Photo by Iwan Baan.
 

While you’re walking along the High Line, you may not realize it, but below your feet is an intricate drainage system that helps to reduce storm water runoff and helps to keep our planting beds healthy.

Here’s an inside peek at what’s happening under the surface of the world’s longest green roof.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
(Left) Neighborhood kids helped create a community mural during Earth Day in the Sky activities. (Right) Alison Knowles’ Make a Salad invited the audience to take part in the performance by sharing a meal of fresh spring greens. Photos by Liz Ligon.
 

On Sunday, April 22, we hosted the High Line’s first-ever Earth Day celebration to mark the end of Spring Cutback, our biggest horticultural task of the year, and the beginning of a busy spring season.

View photos from the day after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Ten local teens spent their spring break working side-by-side with High Line Gardeners while they learned about green jobs from a variety of guest speakers. Photo by Joan Garvin.
 

As part of our ongoing community engagement initiative, we are always looking for new ways to involve our closest neighbors.

This past week, we piloted a new program we call Green Corps, offering a paid alternative spring break to 10 local teens who spent a week getting hands-on experience with our gardeners and learning more about green jobs.

“Green Corps was a good experience,” Javier Montero, 17, noted after participating in the week-long project. “I think it is important to do because [the High Line] is a place for many people to come and they come from many different places. [Now] I have got a taste of how it is to be a gardener.”

See photos and read quotes from our exciting first Green Corps crew after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Celebrate the culmination of Spring Cutback and the beginning of spring with a day of community festivities on the High Line. Photo by Barry Munger.
 

Join us for our first-ever Earth Day Celebration on the High Line on Sunday, April 22!

This full day of community festivities will mark the end of High Line Spring Cutback and the beginning of spring at the park.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Last week, our administrative staff joined our gardeners in the park to help trim back plants near West 29th Street.
 

We are in our final week of High Line Spring Cutback.

Spring Cutback is an intense six-week-long undertaking that involves trimming back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. It’s our biggest horticultural task of the year and High Line Gardeners couldn’t do it without the help of a dedicated group of volunteers.

Stop by the park and see the transformation underway, and follow us after the jump for an update on our recent work.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Work continues as our staff and volunteers move north, trimming back plant material to make way for spring growth. Photo by Annik La Farge.
 

We have just completed our fourth week of High Line Spring Cutback.

Spring Cutback is an intense six-week-long undertaking that involves trimming back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. It’s our biggest horticultural task of the year and High Line Gardeners couldn’t do it without the help of a dedicated group of volunteers.

Stop by the park and see the transformation underway, and follow us after the jump for an update on our recent work.

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