High Line Art

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Categories: 
Photo by Timothy SchenckWhether semi- or fully nude, Pan delighted visitors from all over the world during his time on the High Line. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Pan, a mischievous-looking satyr, has been charming visitors from his perch at Gansevoort Street for nearly a year. Created by artist Sean Landers, the sculpture is part of Busted, a High Line Art group exhibition.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Steven SeveringhausSteven Claydon’s sculpture, UNLIMITEDS & LIMITERS, is obscured by the dried grasses of the High Line’s winter landscape. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

From the lifelike Human Statue (Jessie) to the humorous Nose Job to the perplexing Number One (from the series Heroes on the Run), the temporary High Line Art installation Busted brought together an engaging and surprising collection of sculptures by ten local and international artists. Drawing its inspiration from the dedicatory monuments of ancient Rome, this playful collection of sculptures toys with the tradition of urban landmarks in unexpected ways.

It’s difficult to believe that Busted’s tenure is coming to a close. Over the past year, to the delight of visitors and staff members alike, the landscape has grown up around the Busted artworks and changed over the seasons. Even the surfaces and the personalities of the artworks have transmuted over the months of sunshine, rain, and snow. No matter what season, Busted is a great reminder of the unique experience of a four-season “sculpture garden” that the High Line offers.

Stop by before the beginning of April to see Busted one last time. Don't despair its departure though, we also have a new group exhibition to look forward to this spring: Archeo.

Follow @highlineartnyc on Instagram for more photos of Busted.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Timothy SchenckOur newest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood, photographed by Timothy Schenck

High Line Photographer Timothy Schenck perfectly captured our latest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood in an aerial image, allowing us to see how this monumental work of art appears at a distance. The lofty viewpoint showcases the scale of the billboard in relation to the High Line, as well as how the work's bright colors interact with the muted shades of the winter landscape. Schenck has taken photographs of High Line Art's projects for years, and his documentation of the program's sculptures, billboards, and other works of art allows us to appreciate them in a whole new way.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Vadim KrisyanPhotographer Vadim Krisyan captures the High Line beautifully in black and white. A limited palate highlights Ulla von Brandenburg’s Shadowplay on view daily beginning at 4:00 PM on High Line Channel 14 located in the 14th Street Passage on the High Line.

In this age of highly saturated, full-color imagery, it is refreshing to see the timeless, muted tones of a monochrome image. The starkness of winter lends itself to shades of gray. By using black-and-white, Vadim Krisyan focuses his viewers on shape, light, and subject. Undistracted by color, the eye can take in a scene in a wholly different way. This is especially appropriate when looking at an image of von Brandenburg’s video installation, Shadowplay.

See more of Krisyan’s images of the High Line here, all poetically simplified by the use of a black-and-white lens.

View more of the beautiful work of other visitors and High Line Photographers – and share your own – in the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney

Thank you for making 2013 an incredible year for the High Line.

We've gathered together some of our favorite images and stories from this extraordinary year. We hope you enjoy them. From all of us at Friends of the High Line, we wish you the very best in 2014.

Author: 
Kat Widing

Want to carry around a unique piece of art with you wherever you go? You’re in luck! High Line Art has launched a series of one-of-a-kind High Line Billboard tote bags, which were created from decommissioned works in the High Line Billboard series. And, as an added bonus, they’re eco-friendly. The billboards were treated with plant-based cleaners before being pieced and constructed into each custom-designed tote bag, making every single recycled bag a unique creation.

Read more after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Two visitors enjoy a morning stroll despite the rain. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Photographer Timothy Schenck captured this vibrant autumn photo this morning as a light rain fell on the Chelsea neighborhood. Peering out from between the trees in the 10th Avenue Square, on the High Line at West 17th Street, Tim’s photo captures a north-facing view of the park’s fall foliage and our newest High Line Billboard at West 18th Street.

Contrasting with the overcast day, Thomas Demand’s new High Line Billboard installation, High Line, offers an unwavering bright patch of blue sky next to the park. This seemingly simple poetic image of an empty clothesline is actually a photograph of a meticulously constructed paper and cardboard replica of these everyday objects.

The large billboard format, which High Line Art Curator & Director Cecilia Alemani has used to augment the presence and impact of artworks, creates an interesting interaction with park goers and sparks the imagination. Clotheslines are both familiar and exotic – in the sense that they are recognizable, but don’t quite fit into our 21st-century city-dwelling existence. (Maybe a more Manhattan-centric version could involve quarter slots or a drop-off laundry reference?)

However you choose to interpret and enjoy the new High Line Billboard, it’s not a bad thing to be reminded of a summer breeze on an idyllic countryside, especially on rainy days like today. Stop by soon – this High Line Billboard will be on view until Monday, December 2, 2013.

Author: 
Kat Widing
Basim Magdy, Time Laughs Back at You Like a Sunken Ship, 2012. (Video Still) Super 8 film transferred to HD video. 9 min. 31 sec. Courtesy Newman Popiashvili Gallery.
 

Help fuel the artistic energy on the High Line this month with our weekly #SolarPanel! Organized in conjunction with High Line Art's curated video series, Solar, on view now at High Line Channel 14, we are facilitating a Q&A session between High Line Art Curator & Director, Cecilia Alemani, and the artists – Rosa Barba, Camille Henrot, Basim Magdy, and Neïl Beloufa – over High Line Art's Twitter account, @HighLineArtNYC. The Twitter conversations will occur in four installments, featuring one artist per week. The artists’ fascinating answers will offer a unique perspective into the inspiration, process, and themes manifest in their work. The following day, we will post the full interviews (packed with even more juicy information) on the High Line Art's Tumblr blog.

Read more after the break.

Author: 
Kat Widing
Photo by Timothy Schenck Carol Bove’s Celeste (2013) peeks through the Queen Anne’s lace (Daucus carota) at the rail yards. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Carol Bove’s organic shapes and weathered metals seem to sprout from the natural landscape on the undeveloped section of the High Line at the Rail Yards like the green grasses, trees, and flowers surrounding them. For those that have seen Bove’s fantastic installation, Caterpillar, you may have wondered about the names and types of plants around you on your tour, and so have we! Luckily, Tom Smarr, our Director of Horticulture on the High Line, walked us through the rich variety of flora at the rail yards, giving us a crash course about the rich assortment of plants and trees occupying the landscape.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Steven SeveringhausThose eyes! Gilbert & George's Waking keeps a close watch on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

Waking (1984), the prismatic High Line Billboard by artists Gilbert & George, draws the eye like a magnet. However, unlike most billboards vying for your gaze on any given day in New York City, this one gazes back.

Such a captivating work of art was bound to inspire photographers, and Waking began to appear frequently in our Flickr pool. We found these shots by Steven Severinghaus particularly striking.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - High Line Art