High Line Art

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Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Goshka Macuga, Colin Powell, 2009. Part of Busted, a HIGH LINE COMMISSION. On view April 2013 – April 2014 on the High Line, New York. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

We’re excited to bring you a fantastic spring season of art on the High Line, with new commissions, installations, and video screenings by acclaimed artists. Our overview of what’s on view takes you northward, from Gansevoort Street to the High Line at the Rail Yards.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
#GetBusted ContestYou can nominate and vote for a person who you would like to see commemorated in a sculpture on the High Line.

How would you like to see a sculpture of your favorite person grace the High Line?

For thousands of years, people have been erecting monuments of public figures in parks. Isn’t it time that you had a say in who was up there?

As part of Busted, High Line Art’s group exhibition of ten sculptures, we will be commissioning and producing a new work of art chosen by you—the public.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Frank Benson, Human Statue (Jessie), 2011. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Spring has sprung and with it, new sculptures are sprouting up and down the High Line. Today is the first day High Line Art’s newest HIGH LINE COMMISSION, Busted, a thoughtful and often humorous group exhibition addressing the very nature of public art and monument.

Learn more about Busted after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A light dusting of snow tops the knit hat of Old Singer with Blossoms, by artist Alessandro Pessoli. Pessoli was one of six artists commissioned to create a sculpture for the High Line's first group exhibition, Lilliput. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Thomas Houseago's Lying Figure among the High Line's original rail tracks. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

The time has come to bid farewell to Thomas Houseago’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Lying Figure, installed on the High Line at Little West 12th Street. Lying Figure is a 15-foot-long bronze sculpture of a headless giant, leaning on its elbows between the High Line’s original rail tracks.

Follow the jump to read more.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
El Anatsui in front of his HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

This past fall Art21 stopped by the High Line to film the installation of El Anatsui’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II, located on a wall adjacent to the High Line between West 21st and West 22nd Streets.

Follow us after the jump to watch the video.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Show us who you love! Share photos of the favorite people in your life in front of You & Me, the new HIGH LINE BILLBOARD by Allen Ruppersberg at West 18th Street.
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Couples walking hand-in-hand, families with strollers, friends sipping coffee and chatting – the High Line is a community space made unique by the people who come here to spend time together.

Allen Ruppersberg’s new colorful HIGH LINE BILLBOARD , called You & Me, is the perfect reason to celebrate the special people in your life. Visit the billboard, between West 17th and West 18th Streets, and snap a few photos. Tag them with #youandme and @highlineartnyc by Thursday, February 28 for a chance to win a limited edition High Line Art Tote Bag!

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We’ll be sharing our favorites on the High Line Art’s Tumblr, Facebook, and @highlineartnyc on Twitter.









Author: 
Ashley Tickle
 

In celebration of Richard Artschwager’s blp installation, High Line Art, the Whitney Museum, and The Standard, New York, invite you to participate in the collective documentation of the project.

Follow us after the jump to learn more about the contest!

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Austin Kennedy.
 

In last week’s New York Observer, writer Andrew Russeth spoke with El Anatsui about his theory and process behind Broken Bridge II, his largest public artwork to date, which is now on view at the High Line.

“I felt the skyline is a strong defining element of this city, so the mirrors form large segments of the top. They invite the sky and skyline into the work in such a way that you do not know where mirrors end and sky begins,” the artist told the Observer.

Follow us after the jump to watch a timelapse video of the installation.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
 

Visit the High Line in December and you may be surprised to see two zebras peering out from a billboard at West 18th Street. This month, High Line Art presents a new HIGH LINE BILLBOARD commission, Untitled (zebras), by artist Paola Pivi.

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