High Line Commission

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Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckEd Ruscha’s High Line Commission Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today is the artist’s first public art commission in New York City. All photos by Timothy Schenck.
 

Cecilia Alemani, the Donald R. Mullen Jr. Curator & Director of High Line Art talks about legendary artist Ed Ruscha’s first public commission in New York City.

Can you tell us about Ed Ruscha’s commission for the High Line, which opened in early May?
It is the first time that Ed Ruscha is presenting his work in a public space in New York City. The project consists of a large-scale mural painted on the side of an apartment building overlooking the High Line at West 22nd Street. The mural recites “Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today,” and it is a reinterpretation of a 1977 pastel drawing of the same title. The mural is quite large, measuring 30 x 50 feet.

Author: 
Kat Widing
The artist (bottom center) installing her High Line Commission Untitled. Photo by Friends of the High Line.
 

With less than a month left to see Virginia Overton’s beloved pickup truck before it says its goodbyes, we thought this was a perfect time to spotlight Overton’s High Line Commission in relation to her prolific career.

Read more after the break.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Frank Benson, Human Statue (Jessie), 2011. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Spring has sprung and with it, new sculptures are sprouting up and down the High Line. Today is the first day High Line Art’s newest HIGH LINE COMMISSION, Busted, a thoughtful and often humorous group exhibition addressing the very nature of public art and monument.

Learn more about Busted after the jump.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Thomas Houseago's Lying Figure among the High Line's original rail tracks. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

The time has come to bid farewell to Thomas Houseago’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Lying Figure, installed on the High Line at Little West 12th Street. Lying Figure is a 15-foot-long bronze sculpture of a headless giant, leaning on its elbows between the High Line’s original rail tracks.

Follow the jump to read more.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
El Anatsui in front of his HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

This past fall Art21 stopped by the High Line to film the installation of El Anatsui’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II, located on a wall adjacent to the High Line between West 21st and West 22nd Streets.

Follow us after the jump to watch the video.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Chelsea GrasslandsHigh Line Art Production Manager Jordan Benke working on sections of pressed tin. Photo by Austin Kennedy.
 

We are in the final stages of installing El Anatsui’s Broken Bridge II, a monumental sculpture hanging from an exterior wall next to the High Line between West 21st and West 22nd Street.

Follow us after the break to learn more.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Thomas Houseago, Lying Figure, 2012. Photo by Austin Kennedy.
 

Under The Standard at Little West 12th Street, among the plants and railroad tracks sits Lying Figure, a large-scale sculpture by Los Angeles-based artist Thomas Houseago.

Known for using materials like wood, clay, plaster, steel, and bronze, Houseago creates monumental sculptures that reveal the process of their making through unique details – the varying texture of a molding, the hidden creases within a cast – despite their imposing size and towering forms.

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