High Line Food

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Author: 
Rebecca Hughes
Visitors enjoy Brooklyn Soda Works on the High Line at 14th Street. Photo by Rowa LeeVisitors enjoy drinks from Brooklyn Soda Works. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

How many soda manufacturers begin production with a trip to the farmer’s market? Brooklyn Soda Works may be the first. The company’s creative process is almost as refreshing as their drinks – unlike traditional sodas on the market that combine artificial syrups with carbonated water, Brooklyn Soda Works carbonates their own cold-pressed fresh fruit juices and adds steeped herbs and spices.

Author: 
Rebecca Hughes
Brisket sandwich by Smokeline. Photo by Rebecca HughesThe recipe for Smokeline's delectable brisket sandwich has its origins in central Texas. Photo by Rebecca Hughes

If you’ve been on the High Line since spring of 2013, you’ve undoubtedly seen (and smelled) SmokeLine. Delaney BBQ’s first Manhattan venture is nestled in the middle of the High Line Food vendors in Chelsea Market Passage at West 15th Street, boasting an elegantly rustic wooden exterior and an incredible smoked-brisket aroma. Dan Delaney, the meat mastermind behind Williamsburg’s BrisketTown, knew as soon as he heard about the High Line that he wanted in. He hadn’t planned on expanding his smoked meat empire to Manhattan quite yet, but, Dan says, “I just loved the idea of serving food in a beautiful space to beautiful people.”

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Categories: 
Melt Bakery by Armando Rafael PhotographyJulian Plyter of Melt Bakery talks with High Line visitors. Photo by Armando Rafael Photography

Melt Bakery was one of the first vendors selected for the High Line Food program, and Melt's decadent, locally sourced ice-cream sandwiches have become park staples. As part of our High Line anniversary celebrations, we sat down with Melt chef Julian Plyter and asked him to share some memories from his years in the park.

You've witnessed a lot of interesting things on the High Line during your time here. Tell us one of your favorite stories.

I love how many newly married couples have eaten a Melt sandwich on the High Line as their first food shared as a married couple. Such an honor and so much fun! I've shared a few photos as evidence.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Rowa LeeBlue Bottle Coffee's fennel-parmesan shortbread is a sweet-and-savory treat. Photo by Rowa Lee
 

Blue Bottle Coffee might be better known for its, well, awesome coffee, but the High Line Food vendor offers an array of house-made pastries along with its incredible single-origin drip brews and espresso. Stop by their cart at West 15th Street to enjoy treats like vanilla-saffron snickerdoodles, ginger-molasses cookies, and fennel-parmesan shortbread – a sweet-and-savory indulgence that you can also make at home using Blue Bottle's recipe. A printable version is available here.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney

Thank you for making 2013 an incredible year for the High Line.

We've gathered together some of our favorite images and stories from this extraordinary year. We hope you enjoy them. From all of us at Friends of the High Line, we wish you the very best in 2014.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Guests smile for a photo as they enjoy bean and farro soup, freshly baked bread, and apples. Photo by Liz Ligon

Each year we host the Social Soup Experiment. This year, on October 19, the experiment brought a new wave of community members to eat heaping bowls of hearty bean and farro soup and join in conversation with their fellow diners.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photo by FHL Left: Joel Horowitz and David Carrell, co-owners of People’s Pops, stand at the entrance of their kitchen in Brooklyn. Right: Specialty pumpkin-pie pops with whipped cream are available on the High Line through October 27. Photo by Friends of the High Line

At last, after a whole season in the field, fall crops start surfacing – apples, winter squash, and our personal favorite, pumpkins. Inspired by the autumn harvest, we headed into Brooklyn to show you how People's Pops makes their celebrated pumpkin-pie pops. These small-batch pops taste precisely like pumpkin pie on a stick. They’re addictive too, and you can taste them for yourself on the High Line through October 27. Follow us after the jump to see step-by-step how they’re made, and learn why sourcing with the seasons is important to Joel Horowitz, co-founder of People’s Pops.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photo by FHL Fany Gerson, owner of La Newyorkina, carefully selects jalapeños for her paletas. Photo by Friends of the High Line

If anyone knows how to source and pick fruit and vegetables, it’s Fany Gerson of La Newyorkina. Her famous paletas, inspired by her upbringing in Mexico and her culinary training in Europe, instilled in her a deep love for what the earth produces every season. We woke up early on a Wednesday morning to shadow Fany at the Union Square Greenmarket. Follow us after the jump to learn how Fany chooses her ingredients and why developing personal relationships with farmers is essential to her.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photo by Rowa Lee David Carrell, co-founder of People's Pops, teaches children how to freeze their own pops using a rare pop-making instrument from Thailand. Photo by Rowa Lee

Good friends Nathalie Jordi, Joel Horowitz, and David Carrell founded People’s Pops with the idea that every good popsicle is made with local, seasonal fruit, minimal sugar, and creative flavors. Taking inspiration from unique teas, cocktails, and world travels, People’s Pops was born. These delicious pops are especially popular among kids, which is why our annual Play With Your Food events welcome many giddy kids eager to make and eat pops of their own.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
A Blue Bottle Coffee employee holds up roasted beans. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Holding ourselves to a higher standard is essential here at the High Line, and this commitment is reflected in the food and drink we serve on the park. This week, we headed into Brooklyn to Blue Bottle Coffee’s roastery to bring you a first look at how we source and roast our beans and train baristas to develop their coffee palates – all so we can serve a remarkably good cup of coffee to our visitors on the High Line.

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