Horticulture

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
seedheadsThe seed heads of the wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa 'Claire Grace') on the High Line.
 
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The High Line is full of signs that fall has arrived in New York City. There is a chill in the air, and picnics on the 23rd Street Lawn and the sights and sounds of children splashing in the water feature on the Diller-Von Furstenberg Sundeck have given way to quiet strolls through the park.

When you visit the High Line in the next few weeks, you can spot the gardeners tending to the milkweed pods in the planting beds, and the maintenance staff preparing for a busy schedule of fall programming. When you stroll through the Chelsea Grasslands, you smell the sweet scent of the Prairie Dropseed, or you might catch a blooming Solidago nestled in a bundle of autumn leaves. Visitors to the Chelsea Market Passage can try new menu items from from High Line Food vendors, such as hot chocolate from Blue Bottle Coffee or grilled cheese sandwiches at The Porch.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


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High Line Green-Up takes place once a year at the start of the growing season. This year, more than 100 volunteers from the greater High Line community dedicated their time and energy to help our gardeners complete this tremendous task. High Line Green-Up began on March 1, and thanks to their hard work and dedication, we completed the job in just under a month.

Follow us after the jump for video, photos, and more.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Crocus blooms on the High LineTommasini's crocus (Crocus tommassinianus), one of the first bulbs to bloom this season. Find them on the High Line in the Washington Grasslands and Chelsea Grasslands. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Spring is one of the most special and vibrant times on the High Line. Each time you visit during the coming months, you'll discover changes in the landscape—new shoots of green among the gravel ballast, leaves spreading out along tree branches, and a continuing kaleidoscope of florals.

Follow us beyond the jump for some of our upcoming favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
piet-oudolf-winterWinter on the High Line is a wonderful time of year to experience Piet Oudolf's vision for the park's planting beds. Photo Courtesty of Piet Oudolf
 

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
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Winter grasses on the High LineGrasses on the High Line show a multitude of colors during the colder seasons. Photo by Rich Nacin.
 

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
High Line landscapeA photograph from My High Line, Joan Garvin's new book that captures the High Line's first year.
 

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeCarol Levitt's second grade class at the Village Community School used the High Line to study a number of topics this past spring. One element was this structure, which the class constructed as a model of the structure in its current use as a public park.
 

The High Line is more than place for strolling and enjoying city views—the park's gardens, design, and history are excellent tools for teaching people of all ages. This is especially true for Carol Levitt, a 2nd grade teacher at the Village Community School in the West Village.

Carol saw the High Line as a means of teaching her students about the life-cycle of plants, our city's industrial history, and the importance of community participation. After bringing her students on fields trips with Emily Pinkowitz, our School & Youth Program Manager, Carol's students asked to build a giant model of the High Line in their classroom. Using building blocks, cardboard, construction paper, aluminum foil, plastic, and other found materials, they created a model that takes a look at what the High Line once was, and what it is today.

The students' careful attention to detail shines through in their final result. The model included architectural design features, like the 10th Avenue Square, and prominent neighborhood landmarks near the park, like The Standard Hotel and Pastis. It even featured a garden that used live plants, pebbles, and popsicle-stick railroad tracks to recreate the way the High Line looked when the trains stopped running.

"The children in my group feel as if the High Line somehow belongs to them," Carol says, "They joyfully take their parents, grandparents, and friends of all ages to the High Line and tell them the story. The children followed the approval of the Rail Yards with cheers. How extraordinary that they studied the High Line as it grew and will continue to grow. They see themselves as being the future of the High Line—which they will indeed be."

The photos tell the full story. Follow us after the jump for a tour of their project.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
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pipeAs summer finally fades into autumn, the High Line will be transformed with a new season of horticultural features.
Northern Spur Preserve thanks to the Christy and John Mack Foundation. Photo by Steven Cohen
 

Autumn is one of our favorite seasons on the High Line, and a time when many of the species planted here come into their own.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter

Want to learn more about the High Line's unique landscape? Interested in public art on the High Line?

Our Web Shop has two additions just for you.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeAmerican holly trees (Ilex opaca) were lifted onto the High Line, where they are being planted in the Chelsea Thicket.
Chelsea Thicket South in memory of Janice H. Levin.
 

Earlier this morning, American holly trees (Ilex opaca) — the first trees to be planted in Section 2 — were lifted from the street onto the High Line near West 21st Street.

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