Horticulture

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
year in photos

Dear Friends,

Thank you for helping us make 2011 an incredible year for the High Line.

This year saw two major milestones for the High Line: the opening of the High Line from West 20th Street to West 30th Street, doubling the length of the park, and an agreement to preserve the third and final section of High Line at the rail yards, including the spur.

But so much more happened on the High Line in 2011: a post-snowstorm Snow Sculpt-Off, a Salman Rushdie Karma Chain, rooftop dance performances, 50,000 new plants, four competing teen step teams, mushroom-shaped bouncy houses, a temporary public plaza below the High Line, 15,000 roller skaters, avocado popsicles, a working water feature, kids releasing butterflies and earthworms, salsa dancing at sunset, a historic $20 million gift for the rail yards and the endowment, our first comprehensive book on the High Line, and a larger-than-life $100,000 bill art installation.

We've compiled some of our favorite images, video, and stories from this incredible year. We hope you enjoy them!

Best wishes for the new year.

              robert & josh signature

               Joshua David                                  Robert Hammond
               Co-Founder                                      Co-Founder

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Winter BerryThe winterberry holly (Ilex verticillata) on the High Line near West 21st Street. Photo by Barry Munger.
 

Temperatures may be dropping, but you will find a beautiful landscape, thought-provoking public art, and engaging public programs at the High Line over the next few months. Here are a few reasons to rediscover the High Line this winter.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Senator Tom Duane, here with Chelsea Garden Club members in front of a volunteer's handiwork at 25th & Ninth Avenue, championed the pit gardens and got the green light to plant in the bike-lane tree pits.Senator Tom Duane, here with Chelsea Garden Club members in front of a volunteer's handiwork at 25th & Ninth Avenue, championed the pit gardens and got the green light to plant in the bike-lane tree pits.
 

We would like to give a shout out to our friends at the Chelsea Garden Club.

These hard-working volunteers have adopted the tree pits along 8th and 9th Avenues and transformed them into mini-gardens filled with beautiful flowers, grasses, and shrubs.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


Ever find yourself on the phone or writing an email trying to explain a specific spot or vantage point on the High Line?

As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words.

And that is why your life just got a lot easier thanks to Google Street View, which now features the High Line, allowing you to plan your visit, take a virtual stroll, and explore the park in a whole new way.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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Grass clippings, tree trimmings, banana peels, and coffee grounds might sound like things you’d throw in the trash, but here at the High Line, these are all raw ingredients for “black gold,” better known as compost.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
seedheadsThe seed heads of the wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa 'Claire Grace') on the High Line.
 
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The High Line is full of signs that fall has arrived in New York City. There is a chill in the air, and picnics on the 23rd Street Lawn and the sights and sounds of children splashing in the water feature on the Diller-Von Furstenberg Sundeck have given way to quiet strolls through the park.

When you visit the High Line in the next few weeks, you can spot the gardeners tending to the milkweed pods in the planting beds, and the maintenance staff preparing for a busy schedule of fall programming. When you stroll through the Chelsea Grasslands, you smell the sweet scent of the Prairie Dropseed, or you might catch a blooming Solidago nestled in a bundle of autumn leaves. Visitors to the Chelsea Market Passage can try new menu items from from High Line Food vendors, such as hot chocolate from Blue Bottle Coffee or grilled cheese sandwiches at The Porch.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


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High Line Green-Up takes place once a year at the start of the growing season. This year, more than 100 volunteers from the greater High Line community dedicated their time and energy to help our gardeners complete this tremendous task. High Line Green-Up began on March 1, and thanks to their hard work and dedication, we completed the job in just under a month.

Follow us after the jump for video, photos, and more.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Crocus blooms on the High LineTommasini's crocus (Crocus tommassinianus), one of the first bulbs to bloom this season. Find them on the High Line in the Washington Grasslands and Chelsea Grasslands. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Spring is one of the most special and vibrant times on the High Line. Each time you visit during the coming months, you'll discover changes in the landscape—new shoots of green among the gravel ballast, leaves spreading out along tree branches, and a continuing kaleidoscope of florals.

Follow us beyond the jump for some of our upcoming favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
piet-oudolf-winterWinter on the High Line is a wonderful time of year to experience Piet Oudolf's vision for the park's planting beds. Photo Courtesty of Piet Oudolf
 

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Categories: 
Winter grasses on the High LineGrasses on the High Line show a multitude of colors during the colder seasons. Photo by Rich Nacin.
 

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