Horticulture

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Julia Boyer
EnlargePatrick Cullina, Friends of the High Line
Vice President of Horticulture & Park
Operations.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeHigh Line gardeners Howard Wai and Maryanne Stubbs at work in the planting beds near 14th Street.
 
Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipe'Mount Everest' onion (Allium 'Mount Everest') in bloom in near the 10th Avenue Square. Photo by Joan Garvin.
 

May promises to be an excellent month to view blooms on the High Line. With all the mild, sunny weather, expect to see a variety of different blooms taking off every week.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Categories: 
pipeThe High Line's Northern Spur Horticultural Preserve in bloom. Thanks to Christy and John Mack Foundation.
 

Most New Yorkers don't expect their city to be a place for wildflowers. Our friends at NYC Wildflower Week aim to change that perception, and we're proud to have the High Line included in the events this year.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeDaffodil blooms emerging on the High Line.
 

The first spring has arrived on the High Line. If you have visited the park recently, you may have noticed that the landscape looks completely different than it did two months ago. The sun and mild temperatures have charmed the spring blooms out of their buds, leaving our planting beds awash with vibrant colors and fresh growth.

The transformation of the High Line from winter to spring was no easy feat. Section 1 contains more than 40,000 grasses and perennials, most of which need to be cut back in order to make room for new spring growth.

The cutback process began in February. Since then, our High Line gardeners, administrative staff, and neighborhood volunteers have spent more than 1,200 hours preparing the planting beds for spring.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeEastern redbud (Cercis canadensis) beginning to bloom in the Gansevoort Woodland.
 

With all the plants in bloom right now on the High Line, it's hard to believe there was ever a period of dormancy. From the redbud's bold lipstick-shaped blooms, to the dainty, sunshine-colored miniature daffodils, the whole park is beginning to take on a renewed feeling of wildness.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeJohnny Linville at work on the High Line. Photo by David Kimelman. See more of the gardeners in action in David's album on Flickr.
 

Johnny Linville, one of the High Line's five full-time gardeners (and frequent equipment model) recently told me about his transition from traditional office job to the world of professional gardening. Up until December of 2007, Johnny helped run a branch of a private company that focused on literacy remediation. He loved his job, but was more passionate about gardening, a hobby he had cultivated nearly all his life, from helping to coordinate a community garden to participating in his native Santa Barbara's Bonsai Club. So, one day during the middle of winter, Johnny took a leap of faith and resigned from his job. He obtained an internship with the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, and was able to gain the technical groundwork to begin his new career.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
Categories: 
The Chelsea Grasslands this fall. Photo by Bjoern Amherd.
 

Now that spring is approaching, our gardeners are beginning the cutback process, which will provide space for new growth during the warmer months. In a traditional garden, plants are cut back when their stalks begin to dry during autumn. In keeping with planting designer Piet Oudolf's belief that a plant's dried seed heads are just as beautiful and important as its flowers, the High Line's vegetation was left in its natural state.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Horticulture