Horticulture

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Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
hollyWinter Red winterberry holly with grey birch in the Gansevoort Woodland.
Photo by Patrick Cullina.
 

Here's another sight-seeing item to add to your holiday list – the Winter Red winterberry holly (Ilex verticillata 'Winter Red') that's brightening the Gansevoort Woodland with clusters of lively red fruits.

Author: 
admin
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asterPhoto by Bryan Hou, via Flickr
 

Happy December!

Author: 
admin
kaspar watering holeHigh Line gardener Kaspar Wittlinger watering the grasses just south of the Standard Hotel.
Photo by Auzelle Epeneter.
 
Author: 
admin
flowersVia Josiah Lau's Flickr
 

If the 5:00 darkness is making you want to crawl into bed until April, it may be time for a walk on the High Line, where the colorful blooms and fall foliage are still going strong!

Author: 
admin
aster
 

Last week, Kaspar Wittlinger (one of the High Line's gardeners, hailing all the way from Muenster, Germany – like the cheese!) showed me an interesting phenomenon happening right now: the lighting fixtures on the High Line are confusing the aromatic aster.

You'll notice in the picture above that the bright, purple blooms cover only part of the plant.  That's because aromatic aster (Aster oblongifolius) is a variety of wildflower that depends on short days and low light, and the lighting fixture installed on the rail has caused the plant to receive a seasonally abnormal amount of light.  On the rail side of the plant, it's still June!

[More photos after the jump.]

Author: 
admin
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joan garvinPhoto credit Joan Garvin.
 

It's officially fall. Mornings are brisk, sunsets are early, and much of the landscape on the High Line has taken on an airier, golden brown look as its grasses go to seed. Remembering, of course, that brown is also a color, there's a lot to look for in this new fall landscape.

Author: 
admin
dropseedVia christiNYCa's flickr.
 

If you've been up to the High Line recently, you may have noticed a particular scent coming mostly from Chelsea Grasslands. It's been described as smelling like coriander, a combination of honey and cilantro leaves, or popcorn.   I've also overheard it described, strangely, as a "burning crayon smell", or a "strong chemical odor".

Author: 
Michelle Sharkey
Categories: 
 

Today's blog post was guest written by one of our Greeters, Claudia Berger.

One thing is for sure, rain certainly helps the garden grow. The last few weeks of rain has really allowed the Chelsea Grasslands section to flourish. Flowers and other plants of all colors, shapes and sizes have been blooming attracting not only visitors but a variety of butterflies, bees, and birds.

Author: 
Anonymous

Back in March we gave you a taste of the young flora growing up on the High Line. As we anxiously await both the Summer season (which should be here any day now) and the impending High Line opening (same), we thought we'd share some pictures, courtesy of Ashley Burke, of other plants and flowers that have grown since.


plantAllium obliquum twisted-leaved garlic
Knautia macedonica 'Mar's Midget'
 

More images after the break.


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