Horticulture

highlighted mobile

Author: 
admin
Categories: 
joan garvinPhoto credit Joan Garvin.
 

It's officially fall. Mornings are brisk, sunsets are early, and much of the landscape on the High Line has taken on an airier, golden brown look as its grasses go to seed. Remembering, of course, that brown is also a color, there's a lot to look for in this new fall landscape.

Author: 
admin
dropseedVia christiNYCa's flickr.
 

If you've been up to the High Line recently, you may have noticed a particular scent coming mostly from Chelsea Grasslands. It's been described as smelling like coriander, a combination of honey and cilantro leaves, or popcorn.   I've also overheard it described, strangely, as a "burning crayon smell", or a "strong chemical odor".

Author: 
Michelle Sharkey
Categories: 
 

Today's blog post was guest written by one of our Greeters, Claudia Berger.

One thing is for sure, rain certainly helps the garden grow. The last few weeks of rain has really allowed the Chelsea Grasslands section to flourish. Flowers and other plants of all colors, shapes and sizes have been blooming attracting not only visitors but a variety of butterflies, bees, and birds.

Author: 
Anonymous

Back in March we gave you a taste of the young flora growing up on the High Line. As we anxiously await both the Summer season (which should be here any day now) and the impending High Line opening (same), we thought we'd share some pictures, courtesy of Ashley Burke, of other plants and flowers that have grown since.


plantAllium obliquum twisted-leaved garlic
Knautia macedonica 'Mar's Midget'
 

More images after the break.


Author: 
Anonymous
Enlarge
Enlarge
Enlarge
 

Viburnum x bodnantense 'Dawn'

Then and now! We're finally witnessing the fruits (flowers) of our labor. These beautiful pictures of an early Spring blooming shrub with fragrant flowers taken by Sierra Bainbridge at Field Operations are just the beginning of what promises to be an exciting Spring on the High Line. More images after the break.

Author: 
Anonymous

High Line grasses and perennials arrived onsite at 6am this morning. Friends of the High Line Deputy Director of Horticulture Melissa Fisher is working on the installation of the plants along with the High Line construction and landscape team including: SiteWorks, Kelco Landscaping, Inc., The Plant Group, planting designer Piet Oudolf, and landscape architects Field Operations.

Author: 
melissafisher
Categories: 
EnlargePhoto credit goes here.
 

Soil for the planting beds is set to be delivered this month on Section One. In anticipation of soil, the beds are now being lined with layers of the "Living Roof" system. 

The first layer to be installed: The drainage panel, a black plastic cell system, provides a critical component for water retention, drainage, and aeration.  The panel looks and feels like an expansive plastic egg carton, with small cups that catch and store water as it exits the soil profile.  The spaces between these cups help channel excess water toward planting bed drains, while tiny perforations in the cups allow for aeration to the soil from below.


EnlargePhoto credit goes here.
Author: 
melissafisher
Categories: 

The first of a weekly blog series by our horticulturist Melissa Fisher:


eupatoriumEupatorium rugosum at Greenbelt Native Plant Center
 

Recently, we rode the ferry across to Staten Island and traveled by taxi to one of the Parks Department's best-kept secrets, the Greenbelt Native Plant Center.

Here, hundreds of native plants, including this White Snakeroot, Eupatorium rugosum, are being grown for Section 1 of the High Line (Gansevoort - 20th Streets). Greenbelt is also storing thousands of seeds collected on the High Line in 2006 by volunteers. Some of this seed, including that of Little Bluestem, Schizachyrium scoparium, will be grown for planting in Section 2 (20th - 30th Streets.)

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Horticulture