Horticulture

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Author: 
Adam Dooling
Photo by Friends of the High LineBluebird smooth aster is a magnet for monarch butterflies and other pollinators. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kat Widing
Photo by Timothy Schenck Carol Bove’s Celeste (2013) peeks through the Queen Anne’s lace (Daucus carota) at the rail yards. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Carol Bove’s organic shapes and weathered metals seem to sprout from the natural landscape on the undeveloped section of the High Line at the Rail Yards like the green grasses, trees, and flowers surrounding them. For those that have seen Bove’s fantastic installation, Caterpillar, you may have wondered about the names and types of plants around you on your tour, and so have we! Luckily, Tom Smarr, our Director of Horticulture on the High Line, walked us through the rich variety of flora at the rail yards, giving us a crash course about the rich assortment of plants and trees occupying the landscape.

Author: 
Adam Dooling
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe flowers of the azure blue sage, Salvia azurea, will bloom until early frost. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto by Friends of the High Line

At the southern end of the 14th Street Passage an out-of-place tree sways in the September breeze, attracting the attention of park visitors as they pass. With its tall, nearly 18-foot stature, full head of verdant fronds, and slender bare trunk, this tree looks as if it’d be more at home along a white-sand beach than among the soft textures and warm colors of the High Line’s fall landscape.

This curious tropical visitor is Adonidia merrillii, also known colloquially as the “Christmas Palm.” It earned this nickname because its fruit turns a bright scarlet color in winter. Don’t be fooled, however, about its cold-hardiness. While the trees are well-adapted to living to habitats outside their native Philippines, you won’t find it north of the southernmost reaches of Florida.

So, then, what brought this tropical palm to a four-season park like the High Line? Keep reading to find out.

Author: 
Adam Dooling
Photo by Steven SeveringhausWith its beautifully mottled flowers, the sinonome toad lily easily catches the eyes of passersby. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
EnlargePhoto of Friends of the High Line

In this week’s Photo of the Week, two High Line Horticulture Interns Sarah Ruiz (left) and Raquel Rosado (right) pose proudly with High Line Horticulture Educator Gahl Shottan (center) next to an edible garden they helped plant and tend at Public School 33. We’ve chosen to feature this photo to celebrate these two teens and the important contributions they’ve made to the High Line’s horticulture and the surrounding community over the two months of their internship, which just came to a close.

Sarah and Raquel graduated from the High Line’s Green Corps program in July and continued on as Horticulture Interns, working side-by-side with the park’s gardeners to help care for our plants through the rest of the summer. This season marked the second year of Green Corps – which exposes teen participants to aspects of environmental science, gardening, and what it means to work in the horticulture field – and the first season of Horticultural Internships. This new internship position uses the skills and knowledge the teens had gained in the Green Corps program as a springboard for more in-depth learning and hands-on experience.

See more photos and learn more after the jump.

Author: 
Adam Dooling
Photo of copper iris by Steven SeveringhausThe vibrant copper iris continues to bloom late into the season. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A City MomentThe delicate blooms of pink-flowered indigo spring up from the planting beds at West 16th Street. Take a moment's pause during your next visit so you don't miss them!

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Madeline Berg
Wild spurgeThis inviting flower blooms on the High Line at Little West 12th and West 16th Streets. Photo by Joan Garvin

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Madeline Berg
Emerald Pagoda Japanese snowbellThe Emerald Pagoda Japanese snowbell has begun to bear lovely green fruit, pictured here. You can find this plant on the High Line at West 21st Street.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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