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Author: 
Anonymous

The 1930's Federal Writers Project WPA Guide to New York City, which I love, has a great description of the Hudson waterfront during the time the High Line was built. From the chapter "West Street and North (Hudson) River Waterfront":

"The broad highway, West Street and its continuations, which skirts the North River from Battery Place to Fifty-ninth Street, is, during the day, a surging mass of back-firing, horn-blowing, gear-grinding trucks and taxis. All other water-front sounds are submerged in the cacophony of the daily avalanche of freight and passengers in transit. Ships and shipping are not visible along much of West Street. South of Twenty-third Street, the river is walled by an almost unbroken line of bulkhead sheds and dock structures. North of Twenty-third Street, an occasional open spot in the bulkhead permits a glimpse of the Hudson and the Jersey Shore beyond."


Author: 
Anonymous

This Wednesday, July 9, the new Gansevoort Plaza will play host to a free musical "be-in" featuring songs from the classic counter-cultural musical Hair.

Author: 
Anonymous
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This one was taken before construction began, in the fall of 2005. In the foreground, the High Line runs above the (soon to be gone) Chelsea Car Wash, before ducking through the former Cudahy Meatpacking plant.
Author: 
Anonymous
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This is one of our favorite historical images. The West Side Cowboys were employed by the City to ride in front of street-level freight trains and wave pedestrians out of the way. This was the City's stopgap measure to stop the carnage on what was known as "Death Avenue." The Cowboys were phased out after the High Line was built, raising train traffic to the third story of industrial buildings. The cowboy above is from the 1930's, when the High Line was being built, and the structure is visible in the background. The cowboy below dates from 1911, before the High Line was a glimmer in its daddy's eye.

Photo from Shorpy.com, the 100-Year-Old Photo Blog. Note the guy with the pegleg.
After the jump, the 1934 London Terrace Tatler waxes eloquent about the Cowboys and their brave ponies.
Author: 
Anonymous
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In honor of the dismal weather forecast for this week, here's my favorite rain shot of the High Line. This is an old meatpacking platform on 13th Street turned impromptu surrealist still-life.

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