Photo of the Week

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Supermoon over the High Line. Photo by Mike TschappatOn Friday evening and early Saturday morning this past week, New Yorkers were treated to a larger-than-life moon, or “supermoon.” Photo by Mike Tschappat

High Line Photographer Mike Tschappat captured this striking photo of a “supermoon” last Friday, while perched on the High Line with his long lens and tripod. A supermoon is exactly what it sounds like: a larger-than-life appearance of a full moon. This celestial event – which has the unfortunate and un-catchy scientific designation of “perigee-syzygy of the Earth-Moon-Sun system” – happens when a full moon coincides with the moment in the moon’s orbit when it is closest to the earth. This results in a noticeably larger-than-normal appearance of the moon in the night’s sky. Happily, we have two more supermoons to look forward to this summer – one on August 10 and another on September 9.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Timothy SchenckIsabelle Cornaro's artwork stands amid a canopy of trees and cheery hedgenettle. Photo by Timothy Schenck

The presence of High Line Art’s group exhibition Archeo changes with the seasons. In summer, as lush foliage reaches up, encircles, and even obscures parts of the artworks, the visitor’s experience is almost that of a treasure hunt. Rather than seeing an artwork from a block away, sometimes a pause or slower walking pace is necessary to notice a piece peeking out from the back of a planting bed.

The three sculptures of God Box (column) by French artist Isabelle Cornaro – one of which is pictured here – are both alien and familiar, and both at home and foreign within the High Line’s landscape. One can imagine they are monuments of a futuristic society or that they were dropped here by visitors from another planet. After all, that was High Line Art Curator Cecilia Alemani’s intention.

“On the High Line – where freight trains used to run 30 feet above the street, in a landscape worthy of the futuristic machinations of a science fiction movie – the sculptures presented in Archeo punctuate the landscape in unusual ways, creating a gallery of artifacts from a futuristic past,” Cecilia said at Archeo’s installation earlier this spring.

Download the current High Line Art Map to learn more about all of High Line Art’s current artworks on view.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto by Mike Tschappat

The beauty of the High Line’s gardens is that the planting beds are an ever-changing palette of textures and colors. This time of year, as plants soak up the summer sun, their foliage seems to grow thicker and thicker each day, sometimes even reaching out into the pathway or over the railings. Summer blooms add fresh pops of color here and there: pink, white, and pale yellow coneflowers, vibrant copper-colored foxtail lilies, bright orange pollen dusting leadplant and purple prairie clover blooms, and so much more.

High Line Photographer Mike Tschappat posted a batch of recent photos capturing nearly all of this season’s blooms and it was incredibly difficult to choose just one to be our Photo of the Week. We chose this one, because it features two of our visitors’ favorite blooms of the season: foxtail lilies, Eremurus stenophyllus, and Vintage Wine coneflowers, Echinacea purpurea ‘Vintage Wine.’

Want more reasons to visit the High Line right now? See the rest of Mike’s photos on his Flickr page, and download our monthly bloom list to learn more about this season’s floral highlights.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto by Phil Vachon

If you’ve walked to the High Line’s southernmost tip, you’ve likely noticed the abrupt – yet visually captivating – way the park ends. Long ago, during the years that freight trains still chugged along these elevated tracks, the High Line cut a straight path all the way down to St. John’s Park Terminal, which occupied four riverfront blocks between Clarkson and Spring Streets. Between the 1960s and the 1990s, the portion of the High Line below Gansevoort Street was demolished a few stretches at a time, leaving us with the length you see today.

To this day, a remnant of the High Line’s southern portion still adorns the Westbeth Artists’ Housing building, on Washington Street between Bethune and Bank Streets. In this striking recent photo of Westbeth by High Line Photographer Phil Vachon, wild plants can be seen peeking through the fencing along this stranded stretch of railway that almost floats above the city streets.

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by Joel Sternfeld Joel Sternfeld, Fallen Billboard, November 2000. Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York.

"As soon as Joel saw it, he took me aside and said, 'I want to do this. Don’t let anyone else up here for a year. I will give you beautiful photos.'" – High Line Co-Founder Robert Hammond, High Line: The Inside Story of New York City’s Park in the Sky

Author: 
Christian Barclay
Photo by Juan ValentinVisitors enjoying the water feature on the Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck. Photo by Juan Valentin
 

Take a break from pounding the pavement by visiting the water feature on the Diller – von Furstenberg Sundeck. Rising temperatures make this spot a great place to seek cool comfort, and the closed-circulation system adds sustainable function to sleek form. Located near the West 14th Street entrance, it’s the perfect place to rest and re-energize before a stroll through the park.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Liz LigonPhoto by Liz Ligon
 

During this time of year, as plants almost rush to spring forth from the soil, the High Line's gardeners are working hard to keep the planting beds in tip-top shape.

Throughout the season, our gardeners are weeding, introducing new plants, pruning, adding beneficial insects, watering, and doing so much more. If it weren't for their steadfast attention to detail and care for the gardens, the High Line wouldn't be as beautiful. We'd like to take this opportunity to recognize them for the work that they do keep the High Line an amazing place to visit. Thank you!

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The Northern Spur Preserve from fall, winter, and early spring, to now. Photos by Steven Severinghaus

While winter was a little longer than most of us would have liked, watching the transition of seasons this spring has been a real pleasure.

We loved this series of photos of the Northern Spur Preserve, on the High Line at West 16th Street, that High Line Photographer Steven Severinghaus has captured over the seasons. This GIF shows the mesmerizing transformation that takes place from autumn to this moment (full-blown spring!). Watch the snow melt before your eyes, giving way to early spring bulbs and new green growth. If only this year's winter could have gone by as quickly!

Enjoy more lush spring photos in the High Line Flick Pool.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargeThe Chelsea Thicket in bloom. Photo by Stacy Bass

What a difference a week makes!

Warmer temperatures coupled with ample rain have fueled an explosion of new growth and vibrant color this week. Every bud along tree branches has seemed to burst, and delicate new blooms have popped up along the planting beds.

In Stacy Bass's gorgeous shot, which exemplifies the spring season, you can get a glimpse of the variety of plants that are making their first show of the season. The pink blooms of the redbud trees, the soft bottle brush–like flowers of foamflower, and the green of sedges and trees make this stretch of the park one of the most magical. Just north of West 20th Street, the Chelsea Thicket is an area of transition from grasslands to forest. Here you’ll find a mixture of shrubs and trees, and delicate understory grasses and perennials.

Discover all the blooms May has to offer in our monthly bloom list.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Gigi AlterjosThe High Line’s subtle lighting sets the planting beds aglow in this image, which looks south along the Falcone Flyover, at West 26th Street. Photo by Gigi Altarejos
 

Warmer temperatures, rampant blooms, stargazing on Tuesdays, and the return of food – do you need more reasons to visit the High Line after dark?

After the never-ending winter and slow-to-come spring that New York City experienced, it’s obvious that five boroughs of citizens are dying to get outside. Stop by the High Line after work to enjoy some of the best the park has to offer.

Here are a few of the highlights of the High Line after dark:

    Pages

    Subscribe to RSS - Photo of the Week