Piet Oudolf

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Author: 
Andi Pettis
Photo by Gene DalyBeautiful variations in color, from pale pink to bright violet, have appeared among the High Line’s Hummelo hedgenettle (Stachys officinalis ‘Hummelo’). Photo by Gene Daly

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Photo by Beverly IsraelyThe wild legacy of the High Line's landscape is on full display in the summer, when the planting beds are a frenzy of green . Photo by Beverly Israely

The High Line was made by nature when the trains stopped running, and designer Piet Oudolf and the landscape architects of James Corner Field Operations paid tribute to that self-seeded landscape in one of their original design tenets for the High Line: keep it wild.

The plantings on the High Line are meant to change. They mimic the dynamics of a wild landscape. Plants out-compete one another, spread or diminish in number. They drift in the environment to where they can best fill their niches, and their individual seasonal cycles become part of a whole picture. Over the last five years, the work of the High Line gardeners has been to facilitate and enhance the natural processes of growth, change, and movement in the landscape, and at the same time maintain the integrity of the original design by Oudolf and James Corner Field Operations.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
 

In celebration of the High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details. Visit the web shop to pick up your own copy – they’re on sale now for 50% off!

In this month’s serene image by photographer Cristina Macaya, dried spindly stalks and seed heads of coneflowers reach toward the winter sky, the memory of summer long behind them. In a season when many of us long for the vivid colors and lush foliage of summer, this photo exemplifies why we should take a closer look at natural beauty of the winter garden and appreciate this season in a new light. After all, that is what High Line planting designer Piet Oudolf intended.

Author: 
Madeline Berg
The negative spaces between the thin and airy stems of this grass create a curtain-like effect, providing a mysterious effect.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
seedheadsThe seed heads of the wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa 'Claire Grace') on the High Line.
 
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The High Line is full of signs that fall has arrived in New York City. There is a chill in the air, and picnics on the 23rd Street Lawn and the sights and sounds of children splashing in the water feature on the Diller-Von Furstenberg Sundeck have given way to quiet strolls through the park.

When you visit the High Line in the next few weeks, you can spot the gardeners tending to the milkweed pods in the planting beds, and the maintenance staff preparing for a busy schedule of fall programming. When you stroll through the Chelsea Grasslands, you smell the sweet scent of the Prairie Dropseed, or you might catch a blooming Solidago nestled in a bundle of autumn leaves. Visitors to the Chelsea Market Passage can try new menu items from from High Line Food vendors, such as hot chocolate from Blue Bottle Coffee or grilled cheese sandwiches at The Porch.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
piet-oudolf-winterWinter on the High Line is a wonderful time of year to experience Piet Oudolf's vision for the park's planting beds. Photo Courtesty of Piet Oudolf
 

Author: 
Anonymous

High Line grasses and perennials arrived onsite at 6am this morning. Friends of the High Line Deputy Director of Horticulture Melissa Fisher is working on the installation of the plants along with the High Line construction and landscape team including: SiteWorks, Kelco Landscaping, Inc., The Plant Group, planting designer Piet Oudolf, and landscape architects Field Operations.

Author: 
Danya Sherman
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On Tuesday night we had our first membership event: a lecture with the High Line's planting designer, Piet Oudolf. You may have seen Piet's beautiful work in the gardens at Battery Park City, Millennium Park in Chicago, or at other sites elsewhere around the world.

Piet discussed his theory of planting design, which he describes as "inspired by nature". He then took us through the planting design plan for the High Line. The planting beds will vary based on the landscape design; some areas will be planted to feel more like a meadow, some a prairie, some woodland, and so on. This variation is based on the different microclimates that developed naturally on the High Line after trains stopped running on it. Piet also uses perennials that require less maintenance, and will look good throughout all four seasons.


'Brown is also a color': Planting Design Piet Oudolf Accepts Death

Another one of Piet's presentations is on our Web site.

Photos from Tuesday's presentation are after the jump.


Author: 
Anonymous
The New York Times ran a weekend profile on Dutch planting designer Piet Oudolf, who is now at work on plans for the High Line. The Home & Garden piece paints Piet as somewhat of a revolutionary in his holisitic approach to plant life cycle. He claims,“The skeletons of the plants are for me as important as the flowers," and picks plant species for their structural integrity, even in the leafless dead of winter.
Author: 
Anonymous
EnlargeCourtesy Mary Habstritt.
This 1930's shot was taken looking West along 30th Street from around 11th Avenue, as the High Line was being built. Construction equipment can be seen mounted onto temporary rails. Cranes were built to pass over the trains in the rail yards.

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