Programming

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Author: 
Kate Lindquist


As you can see in this video by Arbuckle Industries, the third and final section of the High Line at the Rail Yards is currently overgrown with self-seeded wildflowers and grasses that grew up between the tracks when the trains stopped running on the elevated railway in the 1980s.

Our goal has always been to open this final section of the elevated railway as public open space, and last week we held a ceremonial groundbreaking to mark the beginning of construction. Before the work officially begins next month, we’re opening the gates for you to explore the rail yards section during the first two weekends in October. Presented by Uniqlo as part of the 10th Annual openhousenewyork Weekend, the self-guided walking tours during Rail Yards Weekends will be your last chance to walk along the High Line at the Rail Yards before it is transformed into an extension of the High Line park.

Registration opens tomorrow. Follow us after the jump to get registration details.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A Social Soup ExperimentGuests gather at a communal table at Friends of the High Line's Social Soup Experiment, Saturday, October 22
 

What happens when hundreds of people gather for a one-pot meal at a communal table in a restaurant without walls placed on the High Line?

Why, they eat of course!

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
julietFriends of the High Line offers free public programs for kids and families on the High Line, offering a chance to learn about the park's history, design, plants, and art through creative play and nature-based education. Juliet Schraeder joined Friends of the High Line for the summer of 2011 as the High Line Family & Public Programs Graduate Summer Intern. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

This special guest blog post comes to you from Juliet Schraeder, who is completing a summer internship at Friends of the High Line as part of her graduate work at the University of Texas at Austin. All summer long, Juliet has played a strategic role in leading our family and youth public programs on the High Line.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Trisha Brown Dance Company performs Roof Piece for the High LineTrisha Brown Dance Company recreates Roof Piece, originally performed in SoHo in 1971. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Despite heavy winds and ominous clouds on the horizon, nine dancers from the Trisha Brown Dance Company stepped into place on rooftops along the southern terminus of the High Line on Thursday evening. The dancers were preparing for their 7:00 PM performance — the debut of Roof Piece — a dance originally performed by the company in SoHo in 1971, and recreated on its 40th anniversary for the High Line. As the dancers prepared to begin, park visitors gathered along the High Line between Gansevoort and West 14th Streets. Some had come to see the performance, and others had stumbled upon it.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist

Construction crews are busy installing plants and building the elevators, stairs, and design features in preparation for Section 2 to open next month. When we are ready to announce the opening date, we will share it with you here.

Author: 
Auzelle Epeneter
pipeCarol Levitt's second grade class at the Village Community School used the High Line to study a number of topics this past spring. One element was this structure, which the class constructed as a model of the structure in its current use as a public park.
 

The High Line is more than place for strolling and enjoying city views—the park's gardens, design, and history are excellent tools for teaching people of all ages. This is especially true for Carol Levitt, a 2nd grade teacher at the Village Community School in the West Village.

Carol saw the High Line as a means of teaching her students about the life-cycle of plants, our city's industrial history, and the importance of community participation. After bringing her students on fields trips with Emily Pinkowitz, our School & Youth Program Manager, Carol's students asked to build a giant model of the High Line in their classroom. Using building blocks, cardboard, construction paper, aluminum foil, plastic, and other found materials, they created a model that takes a look at what the High Line once was, and what it is today.

The students' careful attention to detail shines through in their final result. The model included architectural design features, like the 10th Avenue Square, and prominent neighborhood landmarks near the park, like The Standard Hotel and Pastis. It even featured a garden that used live plants, pebbles, and popsicle-stick railroad tracks to recreate the way the High Line looked when the trains stopped running.

"The children in my group feel as if the High Line somehow belongs to them," Carol says, "They joyfully take their parents, grandparents, and friends of all ages to the High Line and tell them the story. The children followed the approval of the Rail Yards with cheers. How extraordinary that they studied the High Line as it grew and will continue to grow. They see themselves as being the future of the High Line—which they will indeed be."

The photos tell the full story. Follow us after the jump for a tour of their project.

Author: 
admin
singing
 

Are you as excited as we are for another beautiful winter in New York City? Then come help us celebrate the season with the New York City Lab School Chorus and Craft Sweets for a performance of winter songs and a feast of some sweet treats on the High Line.

Author: 
admin
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Yes, you CAN see stars in New York City!

Through the end of  November join us as we team with the Amateur Astronomers Association (AAA) of New York for Astronomy on the High Line, each Tuesday at dusk. Come view the night sky using the AAA's high-powered telescopes, and get a lesson from the experts on the celestial wonders of the fall night sky.

The program takes place south of the Standard, near the Gansevoort entrance. Come gawk at the moon and Jupiter among other celestial attractions. Telescopes will be set up from dusk to 9:30 PM. In the event of a cancellation due to visibility, the AAA will update their Web site by noon on Tuesdays.

[After the jump, more photos from astronomy enthusiast Albert Dépas, taken on October 13.]

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