Rail Yards

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Author: 
Anonymous
Categories: 
railyards

Thanks to everyone who turned up this morning in support of  the High Line at the City Council hearing on the Eastern Rail Yards rezoning. The committee room and another, larger overflow room were both filled to capacity with High Line supporters wearing  "Save the High Line" T-shirts. (To everyone who came, you sure do look sexy in red!) Thanks also to those who took their time to testify to the Committee-- so many passionate and well-spoken New Yorkers certainly made a big impression.

Author: 
Anonymous
Categories: 
railyards
Please note the new date: this hearing is now scheduled for Tuesday, March 31.

This City Council hearing is an important step in the public review process for the rail yards and, therefore, for the future of the High Line. It  will be a critical opportunity to show the City, State and developer how much public support there is for preserving the High Line at these sites.

The Council has been an ardent supporter of the High Line from the very beginning of our advocacy efforts. By coming to this hearing, you'll galvanize that support and send a clear message to all decision makers in the development process.

City Council Hearing on Eastern Rail Yards Rezoning
NEW DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, March 31
9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
City Hall, Council Committee Room
RSVP


Subway: A, C, E, to Chambers; 1,2, to Park Place; 6, N, R to Bklyn Bridge/City Hall

Author: 
Anonymous
EnlargeKevin McDermott
"High Line (Micky) NYC"

As if we needed another reason to save the High Line at the Rail Yards.

Author: 
Anonymous
Categories: 
Eastern Rail yardsLand use at the Eastern Rail Yards, from the existing 2005 zoning plan.
 
This morning, the City Planning Commission heard public testimony on proposed amendments to the zoning of the Eastern Rail Yards.

Author: 
Michelle Sharkey
Categories: 
Enlarge

The support for the full preservation of the High Line at the rail yards continues to grow-- Community Board 4 and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer have both added their voices to the call to save the spur.

At a recent full Board meeting, Community Board 4 made a clear statement advocating preservation of the entire High Line at the Eastern Rail Yards, including the spur over 10th Avenue.

In a letter addressed to the City Planning Commission, CB4 recommended approval of City Planning's proposed text amendments to the zoning plan for the Eastern Rail Yards—but at the same time, they requested additional text amendments to ensure that the entire High Line would be protected.

CB4's letter points out that though Related shows the entire High Line in its drawing for the site, "the brutal truth of the situation is that the High Line on the ERY and the WRY remains unprotected and at serious risk of demolition. Now is the time to put in place the zoning protections to ensure that the High Line will be preserved."

Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer's zoning amendment recommendation to City Planning include an equally strong call to save the spur. In his letter to City Planning Chair Amanda Burden, he wrote, "Redeveloping the rail yards must not threaten any portion of the High Line, including the spur; it should be preserved in its entirety."

Author: 
Anonymous

The turn-out of High Line supporters for Monday's Eastern Rail Yards Public Forum was great: more than 200 people rallied at Midtown's Red Cross in favor of preserving the entire High Line, including the Spur over 10th Avenue. Supporters wore red "Save the Spur" T-shirts and held signs during a presentation by The Related Companies, the designated developer at the rail yards.

Author: 
Anonymous
Another big Rail Yards announcement this morning: the Related Companies have stepped in where Tishman Speyer dropped out earlier this month.
Author: 
Anonymous
After a last-ditch effort to get their West Side Rail Yards negotiations back on track after Thursday's announcement, Tishman Speyer was unable to sway the MTA.

The MTA's statement today was short and sweet. In its entirety:
Author: 
Anonymous

Yesterday, New York Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussof used Tishman Speyer's winning rail yards bid as an example of a problematic trend in urban development. He explains that misleading renderings are designed (or censored) to prevent public objection, so projects can slip easily through the public review process. Tishman Speyer, or course, is only one example of this, but when the MTA's announcement was made, Ouroussoff noticed,

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