Rail Yards

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
The new design concept for the High Line at the Rail Yards includes an immersive bowl-shaped structure on the Spur, a wide section of the High Line that extends over 10th Avenue at West 30th Street. Image by James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, courtesy of the City of New York

Tonight we unveiled the latest design concept for the Spur, a unique area within the third section of the High Line at the Rail Yards, at a public presentation at the School of Visual Arts Theatre.

Neighbors, supporters, members, and friends gathered for a presentation of renderings of the Spur by the High Line Design Team’s James Corner of James Corner Field Operations and Ric Scofidio of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, as well as an update on the progress on construction and the project timeline by Friends of the High Line Co-Founder Robert Hammond.

Join us after the jump for the just-released renderings of the Spur.

Author: 
Kat Widing
Photo by Timothy Schenck Carol Bove’s Celeste (2013) peeks through the Queen Anne’s lace (Daucus carota) at the rail yards. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Carol Bove’s organic shapes and weathered metals seem to sprout from the natural landscape on the undeveloped section of the High Line at the Rail Yards like the green grasses, trees, and flowers surrounding them. For those that have seen Bove’s fantastic installation, Caterpillar, you may have wondered about the names and types of plants around you on your tour, and so have we! Luckily, Tom Smarr, our Director of Horticulture on the High Line, walked us through the rich variety of flora at the rail yards, giving us a crash course about the rich assortment of plants and trees occupying the landscape.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Rail YardsConstruction crews braved intense heat to make repairs to the historic High Line pipe railing. After welding is completed, the new railing segment will be painted. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Despite soaring temperatures, construction crews have been making great strides preparing the final section of the High Line, which will open in 2014.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and view the latest photos.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Friends of the High LineA view from the end of the High Line at West 30th Street offers a front row seat to the construction and expansion happening on the final section of the High Line. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

When construction is complete, The High Line at the Rail Yards will stretch one half mile from West 30th Street to West 34th Street. The design renderings show a meandering path that will offer sweeping views of the Hudson River and a birds-eye view of the Hudson Rail Yards, now home to off-duty MTA trains.

Follow us after the jump to learn more.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Carol Bove's sculpture, Prudence, contrasts with the lush green spring foliage and hard architectural elements of the High Line at the Rail Yards. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The 2013 season of High Line Art includes a variety of new commissions, including contemporary takes on urban monuments, the longest video ever made, and a fascinating installation of sculptures by artist Carol Bove, entitled Caterpillar, in the third and final section of the High Line at the Rail Yards.

Public walks kicked off in mid-May and will continue for a year, allowing visitors to view the fascinating sculptures of Caterpillar scattered amongst the self-seeded landscape of the High Line at the Rail Yards. This magical photo of one of Bove's pieces, Prudence, was captured by High Line Photographer Steven Severinghaus during an early evening walk after a thunderstorm, when the vegetation was at its greenest.

SEE MORE PHOTOS of Carol Bove's installation at the High Line at the Rail Yards.

If you would like to see Caterpillar, we will begin taking reservations for tickets on Tuesday, June 18, at 4:00 PM. Tickets will be available for walks taking place between Thursday, August 8, and Saturday, September 28. Learn more about this last opportunity to explore the High Line at the Rail Yards before it is turned into public parkland.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
View looking east, at 11th Avenue and West 30th Street. Before and after on the High Line at the Rail Yards. Along the straightaway between 10th and 11th Avenues, the self-seeded landscape is being removed to make way for the park’s new design features, but it will remain untouched on the western stretch of the site. There, crews will build a simple path, called the Interim Walkway, to let visitors experience the original wildscape. Photos by Timothy Schenck

Site preparation took a major step forward this month, when crews began removing soil, ballast, tracks, and debris from the High Line’s concrete deck.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and view the latest photos.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Construction crews work on the steel structure of the High Line on West 30th Street. Photographer Unknown

When this photograph was taken in 1933, construction of the High Line, then called the New York Central Elevated Spur, was nearly complete. The elevated railway would soon be carrying freight trains filled with fresh food and manufactured goods up and down Manhattan’s West Side.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
30th StreetThe transformation of the High Line’s final section into public open space has begun. Within the grey containment tent at West 30th Street, construction workers are cleaning and painting the High Line’s steel structure, one of the first tasks to prepare the site for waterproofing and landscaping. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Site preparation is underway on the third and final section of the High Line. Construction crews are working through the cold winter temperatures to clean and paint the High Line’s railing, steel beams, girders, and columns.

Follow us after the jump for photos and more details.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Rail Yards Weekends Wrap-Up: main imageA final look at the High Line at the Rail Yards before construction begins. Clockwise from upper right, photos by Beverly Israely, Liz Ligon, Liz Ligon
 

The High Line’s final section is currently closed to visitors, but earlier this month more than 1,600 people explored the final stretch of elevated railway as part of Rail Yards Weekends, a series of self-guided walking tours in celebration of the one-year anniversary of UNIQLO’s Fifth Avenue Global Flagship Store opening, the Japanese clothing retailer’s support of the High Line’s ongoing maintenance and park operations, and the 10th Annual openhousenewyork Weekend.

Follow us after the jump to view visitor photos, watch video, and check out photo essays and press coverage.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist


As you can see in this video by Arbuckle Industries, the third and final section of the High Line at the Rail Yards is currently overgrown with self-seeded wildflowers and grasses that grew up between the tracks when the trains stopped running on the elevated railway in the 1980s.

Our goal has always been to open this final section of the elevated railway as public open space, and last week we held a ceremonial groundbreaking to mark the beginning of construction. Before the work officially begins next month, we’re opening the gates for you to explore the rail yards section during the first two weekends in October. Presented by Uniqlo as part of the 10th Annual openhousenewyork Weekend, the self-guided walking tours during Rail Yards Weekends will be your last chance to walk along the High Line at the Rail Yards before it is transformed into an extension of the High Line park.

Registration opens tomorrow. Follow us after the jump to get registration details.

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