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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Image by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and Beyer Blinder Belle
 

High Line visitors will have a new place to share a meal next year.

Friends of the High Line is now seeking an operator to run a new full-service, year-round restaurant to open directly below the High Line at Gansevoort and Washington Streets in October, 2013.

Author: 
Patrick Hazari
Enlargenorthern spur

Work is quickly progressing at the Northern spur, a horticultural preserve located on a portion of the High Line that juts across 10th Avenue, just north of Chelsea Market.  The landscape at the Northern spur is designed to recall the self-sown landscape that grew up on the High Line after the trains stopped running. The High Line's landscape team planted over 7,500 native grasses and perennials in early November, before the soil froze.

Construction crews are now beginning to install non-slip, brushed-aluminum grating panels along a ramped structure that will provide access to and from the lower level. At the mid-point of the ramp, a cantilevered overlook will offer visitors views of both the preserve below them, and of the city beyond.

More photos after the break.

Author: 
Anonymous
constructionThe planting team hard at work on Section 1, getting perennials into the ground last fall.
Photo by Barry Munger.
 
Author: 
Anonymous

High Line grasses and perennials arrived onsite at 6am this morning. Friends of the High Line Deputy Director of Horticulture Melissa Fisher is working on the installation of the plants along with the High Line construction and landscape team including: SiteWorks, Kelco Landscaping, Inc., The Plant Group, planting designer Piet Oudolf, and landscape architects Field Operations.

Author: 
Anonymous
Gay Kepple from Millane Nursery, tagging the tented Hamamelis Pallida
for a planting area on the High Line
  Sierra Bainbridge and Maura Rockcastle at Field Operations, the landscape architecture firm leading the High Line design team, have been travelling to plant nurseries around the east coast in search of native plants for the High Line. Planting is projected to begin this spring. Sierra explains what the trips are all about:

"We're scouring native plant nurseries throughout the region, searching for many of the native trees and shrubs proposed for the High Line.  Some of the native material we have found is a little smaller than planned, which only means it will have more time to naturalize and grow into its new environment."

Our first tagging trip was on February 28, to the north fork of Long Island. There we tagged the first tree for the High Line, the Koelreuteria paniculata (Goldenrain tree) for the area around the stair entrance to the High Line at 14th street. Because the planting beds have very shallow depths, we are planting lots of smaller trees and shrubs so that they will fit and acclimatize to the conditions on the High Line as they grow. We measured a few pre-dug Koelreuteria rootballs to ensure they would fit into the shallow depths of their planting bed, but we ended up choosing trees that are still in the field. We saw a lot of other great plants that day, but we went only for the lovely Koelreuteria."

Sierra, left, tagging the first tree for the High Line, with
Annette Wilkus from SiteWorks, the planting contract manager
 
Tagging the Koelreuteria paniculata
 
Measuring the rootballs
 
Author: 
Danya Sherman
Enlargepresentation

On Tuesday night we had our first membership event: a lecture with the High Line's planting designer, Piet Oudolf. You may have seen Piet's beautiful work in the gardens at Battery Park City, Millennium Park in Chicago, or at other sites elsewhere around the world.

Piet discussed his theory of planting design, which he describes as "inspired by nature". He then took us through the planting design plan for the High Line. The planting beds will vary based on the landscape design; some areas will be planted to feel more like a meadow, some a prairie, some woodland, and so on. This variation is based on the different microclimates that developed naturally on the High Line after trains stopped running on it. Piet also uses perennials that require less maintenance, and will look good throughout all four seasons.


'Brown is also a color': Planting Design Piet Oudolf Accepts Death

Another one of Piet's presentations is on our Web site.

Photos from Tuesday's presentation are after the jump.


Author: 
Anonymous
The New York Times ran a weekend profile on Dutch planting designer Piet Oudolf, who is now at work on plans for the High Line. The Home & Garden piece paints Piet as somewhat of a revolutionary in his holisitic approach to plant life cycle. He claims,“The skeletons of the plants are for me as important as the flowers," and picks plant species for their structural integrity, even in the leafless dead of winter.
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