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Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photo by FHL Left: Joel Horowitz and David Carrell, co-owners of People’s Pops, stand at the entrance of their kitchen in Brooklyn. Right: Specialty pumpkin-pie pops with whipped cream are available on the High Line through October 27. Photo by Friends of the High Line

At last, after a whole season in the field, fall crops start surfacing – apples, winter squash, and our personal favorite, pumpkins. Inspired by the autumn harvest, we headed into Brooklyn to show you how People's Pops makes their celebrated pumpkin-pie pops. These small-batch pops taste precisely like pumpkin pie on a stick. They’re addictive too, and you can taste them for yourself on the High Line through October 27. Follow us after the jump to see step-by-step how they’re made, and learn why sourcing with the seasons is important to Joel Horowitz, co-founder of People’s Pops.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photo by FHL Fany Gerson, owner of La Newyorkina, carefully selects jalapeños for her paletas. Photo by Friends of the High Line

If anyone knows how to source and pick fruit and vegetables, it’s Fany Gerson of La Newyorkina. Her famous paletas, inspired by her upbringing in Mexico and her culinary training in Europe, instilled in her a deep love for what the earth produces every season. We woke up early on a Wednesday morning to shadow Fany at the Union Square Greenmarket. Follow us after the jump to learn how Fany chooses her ingredients and why developing personal relationships with farmers is essential to her.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
A Blue Bottle Coffee employee holds up roasted beans. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Holding ourselves to a higher standard is essential here at the High Line, and this commitment is reflected in the food and drink we serve on the park. This week, we headed into Brooklyn to Blue Bottle Coffee’s roastery to bring you a first look at how we source and roast our beans and train baristas to develop their coffee palates – all so we can serve a remarkably good cup of coffee to our visitors on the High Line.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Wild spurge Photo by Rowa Lee

On the High Line, our food vendors are always rotating their menus inspired by the changing seasons. Celebrate the final days of summer with The Taco Truck’s Fresh Tomatillo Salsa recipe, which will add a hint of acid and spice to your late summer meals. This delicious salad contains serrano chiles, a handful of fresh cilantro, garlic, a touch of salt, and plenty of tomatillos. This dish pairs beautifully with any grilled fish or as a burger topping.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
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Incorporating elements of the emerging microbrewery scene in New York City and drink traditions from Hong Kong, Brooklyn Soda Works has revolutionized the conventional soda. In this week's installment of Faces Behind the Food, co-owner Caroline Mak tells us about her internationally-inspired flavors like the popular lemongrass and lime. Caroline also shares how working as an installation artist has informed her new food career in helpful ways. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

I’m from Hong Kong, a city with endless food offerings that have inevitably informed my own palette choices. In Hong Kong, many people brine lemons, which gives them a distinct taste. In diners, it's common to get a wedge of brined lemon in your soda. Inspired by this Hong Kong custom, we brine our own lemons every winter, and every spring, we have a salted lemon & ginger sparkling soda. We brew the brined lemons with fresh ginger juice. The result is a salty, gingery, fizzy drink with a hint of sugar.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
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In this week's installment of Faces Behind the Food, New York City’s friendliest barista, Caitlin McGinn of Blue Bottle Coffee, keeps us wired with fun stories about serving coffee weekly to thousands of people. Caitlin tells us about “life-changing coffees” like the New Orleans, and meaning of coffee for people from different parts of the world who visit the High Line. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

I grew up in New York City, which means I've been exposed to all kinds of amazing cuisine and culture. I have also worked in restaurants since I could walk (sort of!). As such, being around delicious food, drink, and the people who create it is second nature to me. I have found an amazing community in Blue Bottle, and I am proud to represent it on the High Line. We share a common interest and passion for coffee. You can find us tasting new coffees back in our Williamsburg, Brooklyn roastery regularly. We also have education sessions where all the baristas learn about the countries where the coffee comes from, places like Brazil, Mexico, Ethiopia and Uganda.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Kirsten DavenportKirsten Davenport kitchen manager of Terroir at the Porch smiles inside of the famous shipping container converted into a restaurant. Photo by Armando Rafael Photography
 

From baking five graduation cakes for high school friends to learning the art of a soft-boiled egg, Kirsten Davenport—kitchen manager of Terroir at the Porch—has been perfecting her culinary skills for a long time. In this installment of Faces Behind the Food, Kirsten shares the significance of the High Line in her life and why tasting Terroir’s menu is a must. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
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From her early days of cooking in college to working abroad in a gourmet restaurant, Georgia Flaum of Terroir at the Porch has mastered the art of making people happy through delicious food and friendly service. In this series of Faces Behind the Food, we sit down with Georgia to hear why she loves her work on the High Line. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. Any secret talents, perhaps?

I come from a big foodie family, but I didn't become interested in cooking until I had my own kitchen junior year of college. That year, I started a food blog and decided I’d travel as much as possible to experience new cuisines. When I studied abroad in Israel later in the year, I participated in an internship program in central Jerusalem where I worked in the kitchen of a gourmet restaurant called Eucalyptus. I didn't get paid, and I didn't speak Hebrew (hardly anyone spoke English), but I did learn a lot about the flow of a restaurant.

When I graduated from Wesleyan University two years ago, I knew I wanted to move to New York City and work in the food industry. But I had no idea where to start. I was intimidated to work in a restaurant kitchen with little experience and formal training, so I started as a busser at Hearth—Terroir's flagship restaurant—to experience the city’s restaurant scene. I worked my way up in various customer-facing roles. Now I run Terroir at the Porch on the High Line as general manager.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
“Growing up, unlike most families who plan the day around attractions in the area, mine planned the day around where we were going to eat,” says Amanda Meister of Sigmund’s Pretzels.
 

Whether she’s discussing what makes the best pretzel or how to build the best boat, Amanda Meister, manager of Sigmund’s Pretzels, brings a sense of joy to her work. Meet Amanda in our second installment of Faces Behind the Food. For hours and locations of all of our vendors, see High Line Food.

Tell us about yourself and your passion for food and drink, including any fun or unusual facts that we might not know. (Any secret talents, perhaps?)

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I stumbled upon Sigmund’s Pretzels a year ago at a local beer festival where I tasted what was the most amazing pretzel of my life. A couple months later, I joined the company. I am a total foodie and couldn’t turn down the offer to work this great business. Growing up, unlike most families who plan the day around attractions in the area, mine planned the day around where we were going to eat. We penciled in other activities in-between meals. I love good food! I also have a love of sailing, which is why I like our location on the High Line that overlooks the river.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Social Soup GridMore than 250 neighbors joined us for a communal meal on the High Line on Saturday, October 22, 2012. Large photo by Scott Lynch. Soup photo by Jenna Saraco. Remaining photos by Sari Goodfriend
 

This special blog post comes to you from Ana Nicole Rodriguez, a High Line neighbor who grew up in West Chelsea and now works as an editorial intern for Food Arts Magazine. We invited Nicole to join us last weekend to document the second annual Social Soup Experiment on the High Line, an event presented by Friends of the High Line as part of High Line Food, a program that brings interesting, sustainable food to the High Line.

What is a park if not a space in which to bring people together?

That community sentiment, along with a focus on seasonality and local food sourcing, is precisely what inspired this year’s Social Soup Experiment. Dining need not exceed the simplicity of wholesome ingredients and smiling faces. A large spoon, two long wooden tables decorated with apples, and a group of more than 250 hungry neighbors is all you need to make the High Line’s “restaurant without walls” possible.

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