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Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Timothy SchenckHigh Line staff worked tirelessly early this week to remove snow from the park entrance at West 14th Street. Photo by Timothy Schenck

This winter has had its share of snow, and it looks like we may be seeing more before spring's arrival. After a storm, staff and volunteers arrive early to clear paths so visitors can safely enjoy a stroll through the magical winter scenery. (Learn more about how you can help us remove snow.)

We use several different methods for snow removal. The tools in our arsenal include power brooms, snow-throwers and – of course – old-fashioned shovels, however, we avoid utilizing rock salt and chemical ice-melt because of the damage these products cause to our plants.

We're incredibly grateful to the staff and volunteers who remove dangerous ice and snow from our park. Clearing the stairs is a particularly time-consuming task, as the steps are shoveled completely by hand. And keeping the walkways free of ice is a particularly difficult job because the High Line is exposed, much like a bridge, making surface temperatures drop quickly.

The safety of our visitors is our top priority. We block off sections of walkway that have become slippery, and – as a last resort – close areas of the park when walking has become dangerous. If you are ever wondering what conditions are like in the park, follow us on Twitter for the latest updates.

Photo by Timothy SchenckHigh Line staff member utilizes a power broom to push heavy, accumulated snow off the walkway near the 10th Avenue Square. Photo by Timothy Schenck

With wet snow, damage to the plants is a concern. Our gardeners work to minimize the negative impact that heavy snow and ice have on the trees, grasses, and perennials. To avoid breakage of woody plants, gardeners will gently shake trees or knock heavy snow off of tree limbs. Snow banks can flatten perennials, although "sleeping" perennials are actually protected by the insulation offered by snow cover. Overall, the plants on the High Line are hearty and can withstand tricky weather.

Photo by Timothy SchenckThe branches of the High Line's Eastern red cedar trees, Juniperus virginiana, bend under the weight of heavy snow. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Have an interest in being in the outdoors, meeting your neighbors, and having fun with park staff while getting a great workout? Come join us as a snow volunteer! Drop by after a winter storm or sign up to receive notifications when we put out a call for extra hands.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A snowman greets High Line visitors in 2011. Photo by Karen Blumberg

As we speak, snow is blanketing New York City.

High Line Maintenance and Operations staff are readying their shovels, snow brooms, and ice picks for the estimated 10–14 inches of snow that the city will be receiving in the next 24 hours. Tomorrow, while most of us are still sleeping, they will begin clearing the High Line's pathway and stairs in order to open the park to the public as soon as possible. For the first time, our staff will be joined by dedicated Snow Volunteers who will help us complete this huge task.

While snow means more work at the High Line, it also means more fun! With enough accumulation anticipated, we’ll be holding a High Line Snow Sculpt-Off tomorrow from 2:30 – 4:00 PM. Our photo of the week this week is one of our favorites from our last Snow Sculpt-Off in 2011, by High Line Photographer Karen Blumberg, showing a snowman greeting High Line visitors. Your imagination is the limit during the Snow Sculpt-Off, when adults and families compete to create snow masterpieces.

We hope you’ll join us!

Learn more about the High Line Snow Sculpt-Off.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Bundle up and get ready for some wintertime exercise. Join our team of snow volunteers. Photo by Marcin Wichary
 

It's all hands on deck when snow arrives in New York City, and we'd love your help!

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The first snowfall of the year was an opportunity to take some great photos of the High Line. Photo by Joan Garvin
 

The first winter storm arrived in New York City on Saturday, blanketing the High Line with a light coating of snow. Our maintenance and operations staff arrived before dawn to begin clearing the pathways, making the park safe for visitors to enjoy the High Line’s winter landscape.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Ice SkatingThe Standard Ice Rink is now open below the High Line at West 13th Street. Photo by Chris Mosier
 

There is a new ice-skating venue below the High Line. The Standard Ice Rink is now open!

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Snow Dragon The snow dragon, built on the Diller-von Furstenberg Sundeck by Gabriel Willow, Rebecca Pappas, and Raj Kottamasu, took first prize at yesterday's Sculpt-Off. Click the image above to watch a slideshow of photos from the event. Photo by Katy Gartside.
 

The stars were aligned for our first-ever High Line Snow Sculpt-Off yesterday. The overnight snowfall had blanketed the High Line with nearly a foot of sticky, wet snow that was perfect for packing. By the time our staff had finished clearing the snow (check out the video to relive the magic), the weather had warmed up just enough to enjoy being outside. An added bonus: schools were canceled and the neighborhood kids were looking for something to do.

"It was fantastic to see so many familiar faces—volunteers, neighborhood residents, and colleagues—being so creative!" Danya Sherman, our Deputy Director of Programs & Education, said. "The High Line is and always will be a place for neighbors being innovative—and having fun."

Follow us after the jump for more coverage, video, and photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Categories: 


Another overnight snow storm brought another round of early morning snow removal on the High Line.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
snowman-largeFollowing a recent snowfall, a snowman enjoyed one of the High Line's "peel-up" benches. Photo by Joan Garvin.
 

It's snowing again in New York City. The forecast indicates we could get nearly a foot of snow midday tomorrow, and word from the High Line Gardeners is that the snow is perfect for packing.

That means it's time for the first-ever High Line Snow Sculpt-Off.

Author: 
Anonymous
Categories: 
Enlargebench

That time of year is upon us (winter, that is)-- and much more officially so, now that we've received our first significant snowfall of the season-- and the High Line, mythical as it might seem, is no less affected than the rest of New York City by a fresh blanket of everyone's favorite type of precipitation. Many of New York's most famous street scenes and landmarks are transformed by snow, making them symbols of New York City in winter. Judging by the effect of last Friday's snow on the High Line, we're eager to see the High Line join the likes of Central Park, Radio City Music Hall and the Empire State Building in the ranks of New York City landmarks that are altered spectacularly in the winter to become memorable and historic parts of the New York City landscape.

More pictures after the break.

Author: 
Anonymous

The turn-out of High Line supporters for Monday's Eastern Rail Yards Public Forum was great: more than 200 people rallied at Midtown's Red Cross in favor of preserving the entire High Line, including the Spur over 10th Avenue. Supporters wore red "Save the Spur" T-shirts and held signs during a presentation by The Related Companies, the designated developer at the rail yards.

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