Spring

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Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckAn installation view of Marianne Vitale's Common Crossings, part of the group exhibition Archeo. Photo by Timothy Schenck

High Line Art will premiere several new projects this spring as part of its ever-changing public art program, including the outdoor group exhibition Archeo, a new billboard by Faith Ringgold, and a large-scale mural by legendary artist Ed Ruscha.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Barry MungerDo your worst, weather forecast. These petite blooms are a sure sign that spring is near. Photo by Barry Munger
 

After enduring months of bitter cold and snow, we're delighted by any sign of spring. But of all the pretty plants that herald winter's end, the crocus is our favorite. The prolific member of the Iris family grows throughout the High Line, so you're more likely to come across a crocus in our park this spring than you are a daffodil or snowdrop. And we're utterly charmed by these bold little flowers that bloom while snowstorms loom in the forecast ; they seem to leap out of the earth ready to declare that spring has finally, truly arrived.

EnlargePhoto by Mike Tschappat

It's time that these pint-sized plants received an outsize welcome. We'll be sharing crocus images on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram using the dramatic hashtag #CrocusWatch2014, and we've even created a Pinterest board devoted to these lovely blooms. Whether you spot a crocus on the High Line or in your own backyard, we invite you to join the fun and use #CrocusWatch2014 when sharing your pictures.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Spring really is here: the 23rd Street Lawn is open. Photo by Navid Baraty.

Get ready for some serious people-watching. The 23rd Street Lawn has officially re-opened for the busy season ahead. Pack a picnic, slide on your darkest shades (better for people-watching), and head out to the High Line to enjoy the park’s one and only lawn.

Like last year, the 23rd Street Lawn will be open Wednesdays through Sundays. The grass needs to recover after entertaining guests all weekend—an average of eighty-thousand during the summer months—which makes it necessary for us to close the Lawn on Mondays and Tuesdays*. This is just one of the many challenges of maintaining such a popular green space. “It’s really hard to keep it looking good and green with so much traffic throughout the summer,” says High Line Gardener Maeve Turner. Using organic products, she’s developed a program that’s kept the Lawn healthy since its grand opening in 2011.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A red-breasted American robin perches on historic rail tracks along the High Line. Photo by Juan Valentin

The signs of spring are all around us at the High Line. Trees are budding and new spring blooms are popping up daily. And, if you look carefully, there is also a renewed flurry of feathered activity returning to the park.

High Line Photographer Juan Valentin captured this photo of an American robin, Turdus migratorius, during a visit this past weekend. Most American robins migrate to warmer climates in the winter, literally flocking to Florida and Mexico, and then return north in the early spring to breed. You may catch these early risers pulling up worms from lawns, eating berries, and gathering twigs or grass for their nests.

Even if the birds are out of sight, you may recognize their distinctive call which is characterized as cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up – a nice reminder that sunnier spring days are coming soon.

Learn more about other birds you may see at the High Line.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Stop by the park next week for an evening stroll, and enjoy the views from the 26th Street Viewing Spur. Photo by Iwan Baan

It’s official: the High Line’s spring hours will begin on Monday, April 1.

Beginning on Monday, the park will be open daily, from 7:00 AM to 10:00 PM. Summer hours will begin on Saturday, June 1, with the park remaining open one hour later, until 11:00 PM.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
High Line Gardeners and volunteers work to clear leaf litter and dried grasses from the High Line’s planting beds near Little West 12th Street. Photo by Liz Ligon

We have just completed the first week of High Line Spring Cutback!

The High Line’s plants are not trimmed back at the onset of cold weather in the fall. Instead the landscape is left intact to provide structure, beauty, and habitat throughout the winter. As spring arrives, Friends of the High Line staff and volunteers work together to cut back the plants to make way for new green growth. This horticultural effort, called High Line Spring Cutback, takes place throughout the entire month of March.

See more photos from our first week of Spring Cutback after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The buds of Eastern redbud Appalachian Red begins to appear along the branches of the tree in mid-March. These vibrant blooms were one of the many spectacular displays in the park this spring. Photo by Steven Severinghaus.
 

With more than 1,500 contributors, the High Line Flickr Pool gathers some of the best photographs of the park. The images are displayed in a rotating gallery on our Web site, giving High Line fans from afar, or those stuck in the office, a great way to keep track of park life. On the blog, we like to recognize the talented photographers who share their unique perspectives of the park.

Over the past six weeks, as volunteers and staff worked hard to trim back dried plant material during Spring Cutback, the park’s plants have reemerged with new spring growth. It’s the perfect time to be in the park – you’ll find blooms covering shrubs and trees, vibrant green grasses, and spring bulbs popping up everywhere.

Here is a look back at the progression of spring, as seen by contributors to the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Become a member or pick up a unique souvenir – all in support of the maintenance and operations of the High Line.
 

The weekend of Earth Day marks the return of the High Line Merchandise and Membership Cart to the Chelsea Market Passage, on the High Line at West 16th Street. Here we’ll be debuting brand new merchandise for the 2012 season, as well as welcoming back returning favorites like our logo tees and High Line: The Inside Story of New York City’s Park in the Sky. Visitors can also become a member of Friends of the High Line and help keep the park vibrant all year-round.

If you can’t wait until then, check out our Web Shop, or head over to Fab.com April 19 – 21 for a selection of our favorite High Line merchandise at a great discount.

As always, all purchases support the ongoing maintenance and operations of the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Last Friday, David Shrigley’s humorous piece, How Are You Feeling?, debuted on HIGH LINE BILLBOARD. It will be on view through May 7. Image courtesy of David Shrigley.
 

Spring is in the air throughout the park. You’ll notice bright flowers popping up among the trimmed back grasses, new green shoots appearing in the planting beds, and the sweet scent of trees and shrubs covered in blooms. High Line Art is also gearing up for an exciting season of new installations, performances, and film screenings.

Here is a look at what’s on view in April.

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