sustainability

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Northern Spur PreserveHigh Line Gardeners working to apply beneficial nematodes on the Northern Spur Preserve earlier this season. Photo by Timothy Schenck

To the untrained – a category most of us citygoers fall into – gardens look pretty inert. However, beyond the beautiful blooms and verdant leaves of your common garden, a whole ecosystem of life is orbiting around the plants.

A sparrow here, and a mockingbird there. Then there are the large beneficial bugs: worms aerating the soil, and spiders, lady beetles, and praying mantises munching on some of plants’ worst pests. Soil itself is packed with minerals, organic matter, and very importantly, a whole host of tiny and even microscopic organisms. A teaspoon of soil may contain up to a billion bacteria, many of which are beneficial to the garden ecosystem. All these critters together help support healthy soil and healthy plants, making plants more resistent to diseases and pests.

Learn more about how High Line Gardeners keep the park healthy after the jump.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photo by FHL Left: Joel Horowitz and David Carrell, co-owners of People’s Pops, stand at the entrance of their kitchen in Brooklyn. Right: Specialty pumpkin-pie pops with whipped cream are available on the High Line through October 27. Photo by Friends of the High Line

At last, after a whole season in the field, fall crops start surfacing – apples, winter squash, and our personal favorite, pumpkins. Inspired by the autumn harvest, we headed into Brooklyn to show you how People's Pops makes their celebrated pumpkin-pie pops. These small-batch pops taste precisely like pumpkin pie on a stick. They’re addictive too, and you can taste them for yourself on the High Line through October 27. Follow us after the jump to see step-by-step how they’re made, and learn why sourcing with the seasons is important to Joel Horowitz, co-founder of People’s Pops.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photo by FHL Fany Gerson, owner of La Newyorkina, carefully selects jalapeños for her paletas. Photo by Friends of the High Line

If anyone knows how to source and pick fruit and vegetables, it’s Fany Gerson of La Newyorkina. Her famous paletas, inspired by her upbringing in Mexico and her culinary training in Europe, instilled in her a deep love for what the earth produces every season. We woke up early on a Wednesday morning to shadow Fany at the Union Square Greenmarket. Follow us after the jump to learn how Fany chooses her ingredients and why developing personal relationships with farmers is essential to her.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Spring really is here: the 23rd Street Lawn is open. Photo by Navid Baraty.

Get ready for some serious people-watching. The 23rd Street Lawn has officially re-opened for the busy season ahead. Pack a picnic, slide on your darkest shades (better for people-watching), and head out to the High Line to enjoy the park’s one and only lawn.

Like last year, the 23rd Street Lawn will be open Wednesdays through Sundays. The grass needs to recover after entertaining guests all weekend—an average of eighty-thousand during the summer months—which makes it necessary for us to close the Lawn on Mondays and Tuesdays*. This is just one of the many challenges of maintaining such a popular green space. “It’s really hard to keep it looking good and green with so much traffic throughout the summer,” says High Line Gardener Maeve Turner. Using organic products, she’s developed a program that’s kept the Lawn healthy since its grand opening in 2011.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Beneath the concrete planks and beautiful plantings is an advanced system for water drainage and retention. Photo by Iwan Baan.
 

While you’re walking along the High Line, you may not realize it, but below your feet is an intricate drainage system that helps to reduce storm water runoff and helps to keep our planting beds healthy.

Here’s an inside peek at what’s happening under the surface of the world’s longest green roof.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
On the Falcone Flyover, visitors can walk through lush foliage at canopy-level during the warmer months of the year. Current mulching efforts will mean healthier and more robust plants this upcoming summer. Photo by Iwan Baan
 

We are always looking for unique ways to minimize waste, cultivate sustainable operations, and keep our discarded plant material closer to home. That is why we are excited about a new opportunity for closed-loop recycling with the introduction of our own organic mulch below the Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and 26th Streets.

The Falcone Flyover contains an elevated walkway that carries visitors through a canopy of sumac and magnolia trees. Below the pathway, a gently rolling topography creates soil depth to accommodate shrubs and trees, but it is also prone to erosion.

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A new experiment is underway to prevent the erosion and increase the soil’s fertility. Using a test area, the High Line Gardeners recently introduced an application of organic mulch created from discarded plant material from the High Line, with the goal of increasing use of compostable material on-site and reducing the frequency of visits to off-site composting locations in the future.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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Grass clippings, tree trimmings, banana peels, and coffee grounds might sound like things you’d throw in the trash, but here at the High Line, these are all raw ingredients for “black gold,” better known as compost.

Author: 
Anonymous
Categories: 
manhattan
Next week, CUNY is hosting a panel discussion on the evolution of Manhattan's waterfront from a landscape dominated by industry and highways, to a "Perimeter Park." The discussion is being put on by the Sustainable Cities Institute at CUNY, and will feature authors Philip Lopate, Ann Buttenweiser, and John Waldman, and editor Rutherford Platt.

Wednesday, February 25th
6-8PM with reception following
Macaulay Honors College
35 West 67th Street


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