Volunteers

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Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Liz LigonNew York City Department of Parks and Recreation Borough Commissioner Bill Castro shears a tall patch of grass to cheers from Executive Director Jenny Gersten, Borough President Gale Brewer, and volunteers. The Borough Commissioner and Borough President stopped by on Wednesday to mark the official end of this year's Spring Cutback. Photo by Liz Ligon

We've reached the official end of Spring Cutback 2014! After four weeks of hard work by staff and volunteers, this massive horticultural endeavor is complete.

We were concerned about the lasting effects of this frigid and tenacious winter on the High Line's landscape. However, there is at least one advantage of a tardy spring. "Delays in spring weather mean that we can witness the bulbs break ground," said Senior Gardener Maeve Turner. Unlike previous years, when new growth would lie hidden beneath the yet-to-be-cut dried grasses and shrubs, this spring's belated blooms will emerge in our neatly trimmed beds.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Mike TschappatOn Monday, more than 20 volunteers came out to help the High Line Gardeners tackle the densely planted Chelsea Grasslands. Photo by Mike Tschappat
 

We're approaching the end of Spring Cutback, an annual endeavor to trim back more than 100,000 plants along the High Line to make room for new growth. This week staff and volunteers began to tackle several densely planted areas, including the Chelsea Grasslands, which stretch from West 17th Street through West 20th Street.

See more photos from the third week of Spring Cutback below.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Liz LigonThe sight of all these bright green buckets dotting our planting beds means winter is on its way out. Photo by Liz Ligon

On Monday we began to trim back the dried grasses and striking seed heads that added beauty and texture to our gardens this long winter. This annual horticultural endeavor, called Spring Cutback, takes four weeks and involves our entire staff, as well as hundreds of volunteers. It's hard work, but there's no better way to greet spring than plant-by-plant on a park in the sky, New York City humming in the background.

See more photos from the first week of 2014 Spring Cutback below.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Mike TschappatHigh Line Photographer Mike Tschappat captured an interesting view of the High Line with visitors and Chelsea Piers in the background, silhouetted against a warm end-of-the-day sky.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargeLongtime High Line Photographer Marcin Wichary chanced upon this poetic early morning scene in the winter of 2010.

In celebration of the High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

This month’s image comes from longtime High Line Photographer Marcin Wichary. Marcin may call San Francisco home, but the course of his development as a photographer can be charted via almost-yearly visits to the High Line. Beginning in 2007 with a newly purchased DSLR and continuing through the present, Marcin has developed his photo skills while focusing his lens on the development and growth of the park.

It was during a short stint in New York in the winter of 2010 that Marcin captured this month’s mesmerizing image. Awaking in the morning to find fluffy snowflakes falling along the mile-long park was a welcome change of scenery for Marcin. As he was rushing to get out the door to document the snowfall, he spotted this scene almost serendipitously.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Transplanting tassel ferns on the High LineHigh Line Gardener Orrin Sheehan and Volunteer Lebasi Lashley work along the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover. Photos by Friends of the High Line

Approximately 360 species of perennial plants flourish on the High Line and are cared for by a team of dedicated High Line Gardeners and volunteers.

Most of this planting activity on the High Line takes place in the spring and fall. Last week, High Line Gardener Orrin Sheehan transplanted tassel ferns, Polystichum polyblepharum, taking them from dry spots and relocating them to more heavily watered areas. On this particular day, he and High Line Volunteer Lebasi Lashley also planted a few wild ginger, Asarum canadense, and barrenwort, Epimedium grandiflorum, plants along the same beds beneath the Falcone Flyover.

Volunteers work alongside High Line Gardeners throughout the year to keep the High Line beautiful. We are so thankful for all of our volunteers and their enormous efforts.

For more information about what is growing on the High Line, plan your visit and take along our October Bloom List.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto of the High Line by Steven Severinghaus

In celebration of our new 18-month High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

October’s calendar image is a vibrant autumn landscape shot by High Line Photographer Steven Severinghaus. This image was taken during one of our seasonal photo walks, informal meet-ups Friends of the High Line leads with our volunteer photographers. On that early morning in October last year, a small group of us met up at the south end of the High Line at the top of the Gansevoort Stair and set out into the park with our cameras. The weather was brisk and fall foliage was in full-swing. Steven’s photo beautifully captures a short section of park between West 19th and West 20th Streets. In the foreground, the light purple blooms of Raydon’s Favorite asters contrast against the yellowing wispy strands of threadleaf bluestar and red-tinged Shennendoah switchgrass.

Steven is one of a small, dedicated group of photographer volunteers who lend their talents to the High Line, turning their lenses to a variety of subjects in the park. He has an impressive talent for discovering subtle details and textures that easily go unseen to most people. Browsing his Flickr Photostream is guaranteed to brighten your day. There you’ll find hummingbirds alighting delicate branches, poetically composed portraits of seasonal blooms, and a variety of the teeniest fauna you’ll ever find in New York City’s natural spaces.

We are endlessly impressed by and delighted with Steven’s work, and we’re sure you will be too. Join us after the jump to get to know him better.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Wave HillStanding amidst a beautiful garden of flowers is Wave Hill’s Marco Polo Stufano Conservatory, which is home to a variety of tropical and desert plants. Photo by Gigi Altarejos

This week we celebrate another green New York City gem – Wave Hill.

Earlier this summer, our friends at Wave Hill invited High Line staff and Volunteer Photographers for a visit. Join us after the jump for more details and photos from our trip.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Eddie Crimmins A dedicated group of photographers braved a rainy night for a fun photo walk on the High line. Photo by Eddie Crimmins
 

Four High Line Volunteer Photographers joined us for an evening photo walk last Friday, July 12, to document Manhattanhenge, scheduled to occur that night. Mother Nature had other plans as thick gray clouds gathered over the city that afternoon and a steady rain drenched the park. Undeterred by the weather, we walked down the High Line – all trying to keep our cameras and ourselves dry – capturing some fun, unexpected pictures along the way. High Line contributing photographer, Eddie Crimmins caught this intimate conversation between two visitors equally undiscouraged by summer rain in the Tenth Avenue Square, on the High Line at West 17th Street. Too see more photos from the evening visit the High Line Flickr Pool.

Learn more about all of the High Line’s volunteer opportunities.

Author: 
Erika Harvey


Our new video series My High Line highlights the many uses of the High Line, and the people who call it their own.

The inaugural video portrait features Gammy Miller, a High Line Volunteer and long-time resident of the West Village.

Join us after the jump to discover her High Line.

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