Volunteers

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Author: 
Erika Harvey
This week, we trimmed back the majority of the dried grasses and plant stalks in the Wildflower Field, on the High Line between West 27th and West 29th Streets. Pictured here are High Line Gardeners Mark and Maeve working beneath the towering JR mural at West 29th Street. Photo by Mike Tschappat

We have just completed the second week of High Line Spring Cutback!

The High Line’s plants are not trimmed back at the onset of cold weather in the fall. Instead the landscape is left intact to provide structure, beauty, and habitat throughout the winter. As spring arrives, Friends of the High Line staff and volunteers work together to cut back the plants to make way for new green growth. This horticultural effort, called High Line Spring Cutback, takes place throughout the entire month of March.

See more photos from our second week of Spring Cutback after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Bundle up and get ready for some wintertime exercise. Join our team of snow volunteers. Photo by Marcin Wichary
 

It's all hands on deck when snow arrives in New York City, and we'd love your help!

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Rail Yards Weekends Wrap-Up: main imageA final look at the High Line at the Rail Yards before construction begins. Clockwise from upper right, photos by Beverly Israely, Liz Ligon, Liz Ligon
 

The High Line’s final section is currently closed to visitors, but earlier this month more than 1,600 people explored the final stretch of elevated railway as part of Rail Yards Weekends, a series of self-guided walking tours in celebration of the one-year anniversary of UNIQLO’s Fifth Avenue Global Flagship Store opening, the Japanese clothing retailer’s support of the High Line’s ongoing maintenance and park operations, and the 10th Annual openhousenewyork Weekend.

Follow us after the jump to view visitor photos, watch video, and check out photo essays and press coverage.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Beverly Israely’s photos celebrate the delicate textures and small details of the High Line. Photo by Beverly Israely
 

The High Line is a great place to take photographs. Whether you’re a horticulture enthusiast focusing on blooms, an architecture fan capturing the cityscape, or an art-lover photographing the art on and around the High Line – there’s a little something for everyone. The light, the views, the people, and the unique landscape offer a wide variety of opportunities for amateur and professional photographers alike.

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Beverly Israely is a long-time resident of the West Village and High Line Member, and she was also one of the High Line’s first visitors after it opened as a public park. “I’ve lived here since 1996, and I had heard all about the efforts to save the structure and make it into a park,” Beverly recalls. “Our family came up on a rainy morning in June, not long after the High Line opened, and I was so inspired by how the space had been transformed. Since then, the park has become one of my family’s favorite neighborhood places. You’ll find us here often – walking, picnicking, relaxing on the lounge chairs, and attending performances and kids' events. We are so happy to share this treasure and support Friends of the High Line and the many members of our community who are dedicated to sustaining the High Line as a special place for New Yorkers.”

Join us after a jump for a glimpse at some of Beverly’s favorite parts of the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Last week, our administrative staff joined our gardeners in the park to help trim back plants near West 29th Street.
 

We are in our final week of High Line Spring Cutback.

Spring Cutback is an intense six-week-long undertaking that involves trimming back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. It’s our biggest horticultural task of the year and High Line Gardeners couldn’t do it without the help of a dedicated group of volunteers.

Stop by the park and see the transformation underway, and follow us after the jump for an update on our recent work.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Work continues as our staff and volunteers move north, trimming back plant material to make way for spring growth. Photo by Annik La Farge.
 

We have just completed our fourth week of High Line Spring Cutback.

Spring Cutback is an intense six-week-long undertaking that involves trimming back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. It’s our biggest horticultural task of the year and High Line Gardeners couldn’t do it without the help of a dedicated group of volunteers.

Stop by the park and see the transformation underway, and follow us after the jump for an update on our recent work.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Pat Jonas is one of the High Line’s most dedicated volunteers. Seen here helping with mulching near West 26th Street earlier this year, Pat has worked closely with our horticulture staff and is returning to help out with her second season of Spring Cutback.
 

Spring Cutback is a monumental task – one that took us 1,200 hours to complete last year. This year, we have twice as much work to do. The High Line doubled in length when the new section opened last June, giving us one mile of parkland with more than 100,000 plants to prepare for spring this year.

The High Line's unique design, with gravel mulch and railroad tracks running through the planting beds, makes it impossible to use power equipment to cut back the plants. It is for this reason that Spring Cutback is an all-hands-on-deck scenario, requiring the hard work and dedication of our entire staff and many volunteers over the course of six weeks.

Today we get to know one of our most dedicated volunteers, Pat Jonas, who has been working side-by-side with our gardeners on various projects for more than a year, and joins us again this season to lend a hand with Spring Cutback.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
An aerial photo of our staff and volunteers hard at work between West 18th Street and West 20th Street. Photo by Rick Darke
 

We have just completed our second week of High Line Spring Cutback.

Spring Cutback is an intense six week-long process in which we cut back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. It’s our biggest horticultural task of the year and High Line Gardeners couldn’t do it without the help of a dedicated group of volunteers. Stop by the park and see the transformation underway as spring bulbs and new green growth pop up, and follow us after the jump for an update on this week’s work.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Volunteers and High Line Gardeners gather tools and supplies at the end of a chilly Spring Cutback shift on Tuesday, March 6. Photo by Liz Ligon.
 

We have just completed week one of High Line Spring Cutback!

Spring Cutback is an intense six week-long process in which we cut back the High Line’s wild grasses, perennials, and shrubs to make way for new spring growth. It’s our biggest task of the year and High Line Gardeners couldn’t do it without the help of a dedicated group of volunteers. Stop by the park and see the transformation underway as spring bulbs and new green growth pop up.

Follow us after the jump for an update and photos from our first week.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
High Line Gardener John Gunderson advises Spring Cutback volunteers on the proper technique for cutting back the grasses during a volunteer orientation session on February 15.
 

In just a few days, we will begin what has become one of our favorite traditions since the High Line opened as a public park. Spring Cutback – it’s a six-week operation that involves hundreds of hours of hard work to trim back the park’s 100,000 plants to make way for the new growing season.

Spring Cutback is the biggest horticultural undertaking of the year – one that took us more than 1,200 hours to complete last year. With the recent opening of the new section of the High Line, this will be the first spring where we have one mile of parkland to prepare for spring. We can’t do it alone, so we have recruited more than 300 members, supporters, neighbors, and friends from our community to help us complete this monumental task.

The volunteers recently completed their orientation session, where they were introduced to the unique challenges of maintaining a park in the sky. Follow us after the jump for a recap.

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