Whitney

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Taken last month, this photographs shows construction crews lifting pallets of Roman brick from the courtyard onto the building’s fourth floor. Photo by Melissa Mansur
 

When you visit the park’s southern terminus this month, you will see the future home of maintenance and operations at the High Line taking shape. When it opens next year, the four-story building, called the High Line Headquarters, will provide critical space for High Line staff and park equipment, as well as a public elevator, public restrooms, and a public programming room.

Join us after the jump for more photos and an update on construction.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Construction crews are installing the steel beams and columns that will make up the building frame of the new High Line Headquarters. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Visit the southern end of the High Line, and you will see a dramatic transformation in progress next to the park. Construction is underway on the new High Line Headquarters and Whitney Museum of American Art. Last week, the first delivery of steel I-beams and columns arrived on the job site, and crews began erecting the frame of what will be the future home of maintenance and operations for the High Line.

Follow us after the jump for a construction update and a photo tour of the site.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Work is progressing at the site of the future High Line Headquarters. In the foreground, the formwork for the pile caps and grade beam are outlined in plywood. Crews will pour concrete into these forms; once the concrete dries, the plywood will be removed. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Stand on the High Line near its southern end, and look to the west toward the Hudson River. You will see a giant construction site covered with steel beams, plywood, backhoes, and other heavy duty equipment. It is all part of the ongoing work to build the new High Line Headquarters and Whitney Museum of American Art.

Follow us after the jump for a construction update and photos.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The southern terminus of the High Line overlooks the construction site for the new downtown location of the Whitney Museum of American Art and the High Line Headquarters.The southern terminus of the High Line overlooks the construction site for the new downtown location of the Whitney Museum of American Art and the High Line Headquarters.
 

Near the High Line’s southern terminus, crews are hard at work preparing to pour the foundations for the new downtown location of the Whitney Museum of American Art and the High Line Headquarters, which will provide critical support to the maintenance and operations of the High Line.

Follow us after the jump to watch a preview video of the museum, view photos of the construction, and learn more about the new High Line Headquarters.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
pipeThe High Line at Gansevoort and Washington Streets, next door to the site of the Whitney Museum's planned expansion. Photo By Iwan Baan.
 

Author: 
robertatthehighline
Enlargeriverwalk

When people hear I am from San Antonio they often ask if I hope the High Line becomes like the River Walk. The answer is no. The River Walk is designed for tourists, and my dream is that the High Line is first and foremost a well-loved park for New Yorkers that visitors may also enjoy.


Enlargeriverwalk

But San Antonio now has the opportunity to be known for a wholly different kind of public space that's designed for residents, not tourists, and it makes an inspiring story.

The last, large tract of undeveloped land just a few miles from downtown's River Walk was the 311-acre Voelcker Dairy Farm. Most of the property had not been cultivated and looked like the land settlers saw when they first came to the area. Some of the trees there were standing at the time of the Battle of the Alamo -- all within the bounds of the tenth largest city in the country.  Plans were in the works to sell the property for housing developments.  Instead the City, at the Mayor's initiative, bought all 311 acres and set about to preserve the landscape and turn it into Voelcker Park, which will be the city's largest park.

Enlargeriverwalk

And it keeps getting better. Them they hired the team of Steven Stimson Associates and D.I.R.T Studio to oversee the development of a master plan. D.I.R.T is led by one of my favorite landscape designers, Julie Bargmann.
Their winning competition entry is after the jump.


Author: 
robertatthehighline
EnlargeThe La Reunion

I was in Dallas a few weeks ago and learned about a couple of inspiring projects.

Utopian re-conquest of  TX
I met a woman named Sarah Jane Semrad, who, along with a crew of activists, is turning a 35-acre site into an Arts Residency with the main building going up around an abandoned train trestle. The project is called La Reunion  after a utopian artists' colony that settled in Dallas in the 1850s and who brought the first piano, brewery, and cultural sensibilities to North Texas.

More La Reunion photos.

They also have a blog where you can sign up for email updates, and more on the project and its history is after the jump. 

Proved Wrong Again

A year ago I saw Joshua Price Ramos (now with REX) give a presentation about a design for a theater in Dallas he had designed while working with Rem Koolhaas at OMA.  It blew me away, but I put it in the category of "even more unlikely that the High Line" and thought it was the kind of thing that would never get built-- especially not in my home state. I love being proved wrong!

This is a shot of the diagonal supports rising out of the ground as part of the beginning of construction of the Wyly Theater.


Enlarge
Enlarge
 

Unlike a typical theatre setting, this unique design for the Wyly Theatre places these spaces either above or below the auditorium, enabling maximum interaction and flexibility of performance space and seating. The facility's advanced mechanized "superfly" system can pull up both scenery and seating.

Watch the design animation
Live webcam shot of the construction

The theater is part of the larger Dallas Center for the Performing Arts, a new multi-venue Center for music, opera, theater and dance that will open in 2009. Norman Foster and Spencer de Grey designed the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House that is under construction a stone's throw from the theater. Total funding total funding for the project exceeds $277 million to date with more than 100 Dallas families and corporations contributing $1 million or more.


Subscribe to RSS - Whitney