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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Hummingbird moth. Photo by Steven SeveringhausA snowberry clearwing moth, commonly known as a hummingbird moth, sips nectar from a prairie sage bloom on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s gardens aren’t just visited and appreciated by people, there are also a host of six- and eight-legged bugs who drop by. You’ll find the beloved honeybee, innocuous milkweed bugs and corn spiders, lesser-liked oriental beetles, a variety of beautiful butterflies, and even beneficial bugs like ladybug and lacewings that our gardeners purposefully release in order to combat pests. One of the rarer sights, a hummingbird moth, Hemaris diffinis, was captured earlier this month by High Line Photographer – and documenter of all things winged – Steven Severinghaus.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A honeybee enjoys the High Line. Photo by Steven SeveringhausA honeybee enjoys a visit to the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

In anticipation of High Line Honey Day on July 30, we’re exploring the world of honeybees. We invited Dan Carr, Assistant Livestock Manager at Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture, to introduce our readers to this industrious little insect. Stone Barns Center is a non-profit farm and education center located in Westchester County, New York. In addition to caring for honeybees, Dan and the Livestock Staff members oversee sheep, pigs, chickens, and other animals.

Author: 
Andi Pettis
Threadleaf bluestar (Amsonia hubrichtii) with American lady butterfly. Photo by Steven Severinghaus An American lady butterfly dines on Amsonia hubrichtii, the threadleaf bluestar, at West 18th Street. Photo by Steven Severinghaus
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Mike TschappatAn American robin caught on camera mid-feast, on the High Line at West 23rd Street. Photo by Mike Tschappat
 

This past week, visitors were treated to a surprising sight: a large flock of robins had descended upon the Eastern red cedar trees on the High Line, bouncing back and forth between the branches and feasting on the trees’ bright blue berries. At times, a nearby mockingbird could be seen attempting to defend his buffet of berries, with little luck.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Steven SeveringhausA mockingbird enjoys the "berries" – actually cones – of one of the High Line's Emerald Sentinel® Eastern red cedar trees. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Orrin Sheehan
Photo by Steven SeveringhausThis hungry sparrow doesn't mind the astringent taste of the Viking black chokeberry. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
High Line Photographer Phil Vachon captured this beautiful shot of a monarch butterfly as it perched on a broadleaf ironweed bloom last September. Photo by Phil Vachon

Late summer blooms are in full-swing at the High Line, and accordingly the park’s plantings are abuzz with pollinators.

This month, we’ll be celebrating one of nature’s most graceful pollinators: the monarch butterfly. At our weekly Wild Wednesday programs throughout the month of August, families are invited to learn about the lifecycle of monarch butterflies, from wriggly caterpillars to wrapped-up chrysalises, and finally to full-grown adults stretching their new wings. During an extra special session of our Wild Wednesday Creature Feature on Wednesday, August 28, our butterfly project will culminate with a release of the adult monarchs for their very first flight in the park.

If you’re not able to make it to Wild Wednesday, keep an eye out for butterflies during your next stroll along the park. Photographing winged pollinators takes patience and some luck, but gorgeous shots like this one by Phil Vachon are well worth the wait and truly capture the essence of summer.

Browse more photos in the High Line Flickr Pool or share your own.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez

The High Line and Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm recently hosted Honey Day, an annual family-friendly event that educates participants about the important role of the honeybee.

Through fun activities, honey tastings, and an open market featuring local beekeepers’ crafts and honey, participants discovered why the honeybee is our friend and an industrious worker.

Our food vendors also crafted honey-themed menus, from honey-infused beers to wildflower honey-roasted plum paletas.

Participants celebrated the honeybee and left bee-utifully inspired by nature’s wonder.

Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm’s Asher Dov teaches curious children the many ways bees are important to our ecosystem using an observational beehive with more than 2,000 bees from their farm in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A red-breasted American robin perches on historic rail tracks along the High Line. Photo by Juan Valentin

The signs of spring are all around us at the High Line. Trees are budding and new spring blooms are popping up daily. And, if you look carefully, there is also a renewed flurry of feathered activity returning to the park.

High Line Photographer Juan Valentin captured this photo of an American robin, Turdus migratorius, during a visit this past weekend. Most American robins migrate to warmer climates in the winter, literally flocking to Florida and Mexico, and then return north in the early spring to breed. You may catch these early risers pulling up worms from lawns, eating berries, and gathering twigs or grass for their nests.

Even if the birds are out of sight, you may recognize their distinctive call which is characterized as cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up – a nice reminder that sunnier spring days are coming soon.

Learn more about other birds you may see at the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A Northern Mockingbird discovers delicious berries on the High Line’s winter landscape. Photo by Matt MacGillivray
 

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