Ashley Tickle's blog

highlighted mobile

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckAn installation view of Carol Bove's High Line Commission Caterpillar installed on the High Line at the Rail Yards in 2013. Photo by Timothy Schenck.

Friends of the High Line founded High Line Art in 2009 with the opening of the first section of the High Line. The mission of High Line Art is to present a wide array of artwork including site-specific commissions, exhibitions, performances, video programs, and a series of billboard interventions. We invite artists to think of creative ways to engage with the uniqueness of the architecture, history, and design of the High Line and to foster a productive dialogue with the surrounding neighborhood and urban landscape. Since 2011, High Line Art has been curated by Cecilia Alemani. Previously, the program was curated by Lauren Ross.

Since 2009, High Line Art has worked with over 120 artists from around the world, including up-and-coming artists as well as mid-career and established artists. We have presented more than 22 commissions; 21 videos on High Line Channels 14 and 22; 18 billboards; and 14 performances.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckPhoto by Timothy Schenck
 

There are only a few days left to see artist’s Faith Ringgold’s fun and colorful High Line Billboard, Groovin High, next to the High Line at West 18th Street.

Faith Ringgold is a painter, writer, speaker, mixed media sculptor, and performance artist working in Englewood, New Jersey. Since the early 1960s, Ringgold has been known since for her story quilts, politically charged paintings and prints, and illustrated children’s books. She has eloquently articulated a critical perspective on American identity through the lenses of the feminist and civil rights movements. Her boldly colorful geometric compositions point to influences from early American and European Modernism, dhakas – richly brocaded Tibetan paintings – and African masks. Her choice of the quilt as her primary medium in later years reflects a fundamental connection to practicality and her ancestors' feminine crafts.

For the High Line, Ringgold revisited her colorful and paradigmatic story quilt Groovin High (1986), one of the many story quilts Ringgold created that inspired a revival of the medium in the late 1970s. Depicting a crowded dance hall bordered by quilted hand-dyed fabrics, Groovin High is evocative of Ringgold’s memories of Sunday afternoon dances at the Savoy and her connection to the African American communities of her native Harlem. Her style reflects formal treatments of shape, color, and perspective reminiscent of many painters whose styles defined the Harlem Renaissance, an immensely productive and creative cultural movement of the 1920s that erupted out of the African American community living in the eponymous New York neighborhood.

Groovin High will be on view through June 2 and is located within the Edison ParkFast parking lot next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue.

You can also visit Ringgold’s mosaic Flying Home: Harlem Heroes and Heroines (Downtown and Uptown) at the 125th Street 2/ 3 subway station.

See more photographs of Groovin High below.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckEd Ruscha’s High Line Commission Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today is the artist’s first public art commission in New York City. All photos by Timothy Schenck.
 

Cecilia Alemani, the Donald R. Mullen Jr. Curator & Director of High Line Art talks about legendary artist Ed Ruscha’s first public commission in New York City.

Can you tell us about Ed Ruscha’s commission for the High Line, which opened in early May?
It is the first time that Ed Ruscha is presenting his work in a public space in New York City. The project consists of a large-scale mural painted on the side of an apartment building overlooking the High Line at West 22nd Street. The mural recites “Honey, I Twisted Through More Damn Traffic Today,” and it is a reinterpretation of a 1977 pastel drawing of the same title. The mural is quite large, measuring 30 x 50 feet.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Photo by Timothy SchenckAn installation view of Marianne Vitale's Common Crossings, part of the group exhibition Archeo. Photo by Timothy Schenck

High Line Art will premiere several new projects this spring as part of its ever-changing public art program, including the outdoor group exhibition Archeo, a new billboard by Faith Ringgold, and a large-scale mural by legendary artist Ed Ruscha.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Gilbert & George, Waking. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

The High Line Art Billboard is back in action, sporting Gilbert & George’s Waking (1984) next to the High Line at West 18th Street. With luminous colors and thick black outlined figures, the semi-mirrored composition of faces and bodies recalls the look of a stained glass window. Gilbert & George stand confidently in the center of the billboard, with their hands clasped in front of them, surrounded by mask-like faces and a line-up of young men. Taken together with the title, the scene suggests a sort of inner awakening in the passage from boyhood to manhood supported by the inclusion of various age groups.

Read more after the break.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Raymond Pettibon, No Title (Safe he called...), 2013. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York / London.
 

You only have a few more days to see artist Raymond Pettibon’s High Line Billboard No Title (Safe he called…), on view next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue. A work from his famous series of baseball drawings, Pettibon’s piece depicts the movements and dynamism of a game between the Boston Red Sox and the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Frank Benson, Human Statue (Jessie), 2011. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Spring has sprung and with it, new sculptures are sprouting up and down the High Line. Today is the first day High Line Art’s newest HIGH LINE COMMISSION, Busted, a thoughtful and often humorous group exhibition addressing the very nature of public art and monument.

Learn more about Busted after the jump.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Thomas Houseago's Lying Figure among the High Line's original rail tracks. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

The time has come to bid farewell to Thomas Houseago’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Lying Figure, installed on the High Line at Little West 12th Street. Lying Figure is a 15-foot-long bronze sculpture of a headless giant, leaning on its elbows between the High Line’s original rail tracks.

Follow the jump to read more.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
El Anatsui in front of his HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II. Photo by Austin Kennedy.

This past fall Art21 stopped by the High Line to film the installation of El Anatsui’s HIGH LINE COMMISSION Broken Bridge II, located on a wall adjacent to the High Line between West 21st and West 22nd Streets.

Follow us after the jump to watch the video.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
 

In celebration of Richard Artschwager’s blp installation, High Line Art, the Whitney Museum, and The Standard, New York, invite you to participate in the collective documentation of the project.

Follow us after the jump to learn more about the contest!

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Ashley Tickle's blog