Plant of the Week: Swamp Azalea

Chelsea Grasslands Now is the time to enjoy the brilliant seasonal foliage of swamp azalea on the Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and West 27th Streets. Photo by Josiah Lau
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Swamp azalea, Rhododendron viscosum, is native to the southern and eastern United States, where it is often found along the banks of streams and in wetland areas. Sometimes referred to as “swamp honeysuckle,” this plant is a large shrub that blooms densely with white clusters of spicy-scented flowers in the early summer.

This time of year, swamp azalea takes on a whole new look as foliage turns to orange and maroon.

WHERE TO SEE THIS PLANT
On the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and West 27th Streets

Download our November Bloom Guide.

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