Raymond Pettibon Brings America’s Favorite Pastime to the High Line

Raymond Pettibon, No Title (Safe he called...), 2013. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York / London.
 

You only have a few more days to see artist Raymond Pettibon’s High Line Billboard No Title (Safe he called…), on view next to the High Line at West 18th Street and 10th Avenue. A work from his famous series of baseball drawings, Pettibon’s piece depicts the movements and dynamism of a game between the Boston Red Sox and the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Raymond Pettibon has been composing an extensive body of works that investigate the many aspects of American culture, touching upon issues of religion, politics, sexuality, literature, and sport. Pettibon emerged in the late 1970s in the underground music scene of Los Angeles and created album covers for punk-rock bands like Black Flag and Sonic Youth. Since then, he has been using the language of comics and caricature to sketch a portrait of America through its deepest feelings and desires.

For the High Line, Pettibon presents a new interpretation of his 2010 drawing. Alluding to an East Coast-West Coast feud throughout the drawing, Pettibon writes “Moses”—a reference to Robert Moses, the New York City power broker who played a major role in the Dodgers move from Brooklyn to L.A., and the biblical Moses, who led his people on an exodus to the promised land. “Jackie” refers to Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play in the Major League, while “Where Brooklyn at?” references the chant from the famous freestyle rap battle between East Coast rapper Notorious B.I.G. and West Coast rapper Tupac Shakur.

Pettibon’s High Line Billboard will be on view through Monday, July 1, 2013.

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