2013: The Year in Photos

Thank you for making 2013 an incredible year for the High Line.

We've gathered together some of our favorite images and stories from this extraordinary year. We hope you enjoy them. From all of us at Friends of the High Line, we wish you the very best in 2014.

Volunteers and staff worked together to clear snow following February's winter storm "Nemo." Learn more about the efforts of our amazing volunteers in 2013, and how you can become a volunteer.
Photo by David Wilkinson

West African artist El Anatsui's monumental sculpture Broken Bridge II awed visitors at West 21st and 22nd Streets from November 2012 to November 2013. The shimmering wall of recycled pressed tin and mirrors measured 37 feet high by 157 feet wide, making it Anatsui's largest outdoor work to date. To learn more about the sculpture and its installation, watch Art21'sfantastic video.
Photo by Friends of the High Line

High Line Educator Gahl Shottan talks to fourth graders about the Meatpacking District's history in this spring photograph. High Line Field Trips, which are part of High Line Education, began in 2009. We held 101 of these classes for 3,023 students in 2013!
Photo by Rowa Lee

Each March, we trim back the High Line's plants to make room for new growth. Called Spring Cutback, this massive horticulture task entails trimming more than 100,000 plants. With the help of our dedicated volunteers, we were able to complete this year's Cutback in just four weeks – a record.

The amazing teens in our Green Corps were among the dedicated staff who made this effort possible.
Photo by Liz Ligon

From April through October, High Line Food vendors provided delicious meals and snacks to our visitors. Thank you to Blue Bottle Coffee, Brooklyn Soda Works, Delaney Barbecue’s SmokeLine, La Newyorkina, L’Arte del Gelato, Melt Bakery, People’s Pops, The Taco Truck, and Terroir at The Porch for a mouthwatering 2013.
Photos by: (First row from left) Jenna Saraco, Rowa Lee, Nicole Franzen; (Second row from left) Friends of the High Line, Nicole Franzen, Friends of the High Line; (Third row from left) Nicole Franzen, Ed Anderson courtesy of Ten Speed Press Publications, Rowa Lee

The re-opening of Terroir at The Porch each spring is always an exciting occasion, as well as a great excuse to sample some artisanal wines and beers. An open-air, full-service café, The Porch serves drinks and small plates from its shipping-container-turned-restaurant. If you're missing The Porch this winter, you can create its delicious farro salad recipe at home.
Photo by Rowa Lee

These eye-catching blooms are among the first signs of spring on the High Line. Lady Jane Tulips (Tulipa clusiana 'Lady Jane') are just one of the more than 300 plant species that grow on the High Line today. To become better acquainted with the park's perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees, check out our bloom lists, updated monthly, and follow along with the Plant of the Week.
Photo by David Wilkinson

In July, we partnered with J.Crew to launch a special new collection celebrating the High Line. A few of our friends came by the High Line to try on the linen tees, vintage sweatshirts, and adorable children's clothes in the park that inspired them.
Photo by Liz Ligon

Renowned urban strategists Enrique Peñalosa and Majora Carter joined us for a July 15 panel discussion on building and sustaining equality in public open space. The discussion was part of "Beyond the High Line," a series of free talks to educate and inspire conversation about the transformation of the country's out-of-use industrial infrastructure into public open space. See videos of all our Beyond the High Line talks.
Photo by Rowa Lee

Attendees had a fabulous time at our Summer Party, presented by Coach. The event featured boardwalk games (with Coach bags and accessories as prizes!), tunes by DJ Kiss, performances by acrobats, fortune-telling, and much more. Thanks to generous underwriting by Coach, 100% of the proceeds from ticket sales directly benefitted the maintenance and operation of our park in the sky. See a video of the party.
Photo by Billy Farrell Agency

We welcomed more than 275 teens to our first High Line Teen Night on July 18. The High Line Teen Arts Council produced the event, and followed up this success with another popular Teen Night in August.
Photo by Rowa Lee

Our friends at Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm returned for this year's Honey Day, bringing an observational beehive to teach our youngest visitors about the industrious honeybee. Tastings, activities, and special honey-infused treats from our High Line Food vendors left visitors with sweet memories. The event is just one of more than 450 free public programs we held this year.
Photo by Friends of the High Line

We celebrated Chelsea National Night Out in August, sponsoring a petting zoo and moonlighting as face-painters for the community event, which was organized by the PSA4 Community Council, Fulton Houses Tenant Association, and Fulton Youth of the Future. Highlights included live music by Orland Marin, a bouncy castle, and at least one alpaca.
Photo by Friends of the High Line

We hosted our first official public runway event this August – a back-to-school teen fashion show. We recruited a group of local teens to work with professional fashion designers and create looks for the event. The dress in the above photo was designed by the teens themselves!
Photo by Liz Ligon

High Line Co-Founders Joshua David and Robert Hammond accepted the prestigious Vincent Scully Prize in September. "The High Line was designed to celebrate its urban condition and the built environment that surrounds it," said Joshua during the original talk that he and Robert gave at the award ceremony. See a video of their whole talk, titled "Harnessing Friction."
Photo by Emily Clack Photography

We held our first High Line Art Dinner on September 18, which featured a preview performance of Pablo Bronstein's Intermezzo: Two girls wear fashion garments on a palm tree. Ticket sales from the event raised crucial funds to support the High Line Art program, along with the maintenance and operations of the High Line.
Photo by Clint Spaulding for Patrick McMullan

For his original High Line Art Performance, Intermezzo: Two girls wear fashion garments on a palm tree, artist Pablo Bronstein temporarily installed an 18-foot Christmas Palm (Adonidia merrillii) on the High Line. As the culmination of the September 19 performance, two dancers ascended the palm tree using a scissor lift, and made their final flourishes at the top of our tropical "visitor."
Photo by Liz Ligon

Guests enjoyed hearty bean-and-farro soup – as well as stimulating conversation – at our third-annual Social Soup Experiment on October 19.
Photo by Liz Ligon

Boo! More than 2,500 people celebrated our third-annual Haunted High Line Halloween, which featured trick-or-treating, art activities, "real" ghosts, and a hay-bale maze.
Photo by Rowa Lee

In October, we had the pleasure of introducing Jenny Gersten as our new Executive Director. Jenny will succeed Robert Hammond, who is stepping down from the Executive Director position at the end of this year. Joshua David will remain with Friends of the High Line as its President and will be working closely with Jenny in her role as Executive Director. Meet Jenny.
Photo by Liz Ligon

Sarah Ruiz (left) and Raquel Rosado (right) pose with High Line Horticulture Educator Gahl Shottan (center) next to an edible garden they helped plant and tend at Public School 33. Before becoming Horticulture Interns, Sarah and Raquel graduated from High Line's Green Corps program, a six-month initiative that teaches area teens horticultural skills and trains them for careers in growing industries. We're so proud of all our teen staff members!

Artist Carol Bove has created a site-specific installation in the High Line at the Rail Yards, the undeveloped third section of the High Line north of West 30th Street. Caterpillar, Bove's seven-sculpture installation, has been on view since mid-May. Visitors can sign up for free walks to take in the art and the stunning views of the Hudson River.

The interplay of Bove's sculptures with the still-wild vegetation of the rail yards has inspired a good deal of gorgeous photography, such as this beautiful image. Caterpillar will be on view until May of 2014.
Photo by Steven Severinghaus

We expanded our community engagement in 2013. This photograph is from our February community party in the Fulton Houses. One of our teen staff members, Brian Bass, talks with a young Fulton resident.

Visitors have been posing with Human Statue (Jessie), by artist Frank Benson, since we installed the artwork in April. The sculpture is part of Busted, a High Line Art group exhibition featuring works by ten artists. One of the sculptures, Florent by John Ahearn, was created as part of our #GetBusted contest. Activist and restaurateur Florent Morellet was chosen to be the subject of the show's tenth bust. Ahearn made a live cast of Morellet in a public event on the High Line. See Jessie, Florent, and all of the sculptures on the High Line through this coming April.
Photo by Timothy Schenck

The kaleidoscopic Waking by artists Gilbert & George, was one of six High Line Billboards to greet visitors at West 18th Street this year. Each billboard inspires a lot of beautiful photography, Waking in particular. Although each billboard is on view for only a month, we've recycled several of the works into one-of-a-kind tote bags, rather than leaving them in storage.
Photo by Timothy Schenck

High Line Art presents art videos at West 14th and West 22nd Streets. High Line Channel 14 and High Line Channel 22, as they're called, feature a changing variety of videos. From October through early December of this year, Channel 22 screened Kayak by artist Roman Signer, captured in this photograph.
Photo by Timothy Schenck

Construction crews have been making great strides preparing the rail yards – the third and final section of the High Line – which will open in late 2014. This photograph looks east along 30th Street, and offers a glimpse at the pavers that make up our walkway. See more photographs of the rail yards.
Photo by Timothy Schenck

Beneath the concrete deck at the Spur – at 10th Avenue and 30th Street – we can see the High Line’s steel structure below.
Photo by Timothy Schenck

Our new video series My High Line highlights the many uses of the High Line, and the people who call it their own. The inaugural video portrait featured Gammy Miller, a High Line Volunteer and long-time resident of the West Village. Check back for more installments in the series.

We cannot wait to move into our new headquarters, The Diller – von Furstenberg Building. Located at the High Line's southern end, our new maintenance and operations hub will provide crucial facilities. In addition to providing essential amenities for visitors, such as an elevator and public restrooms, it will house our gardeners, maintenance workers, educators, administrators, and public program staff. Learn more.
Image by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and Beyer Blinder Belle

Thank you to everyone who visited in 2013 – all 4.6 million of you! Photo by Juan Valentin

We’d like to thank our generous funders and program partners who helped make all of these programs possible.

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