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Author: 
Erika Harvey
joan garvin

With more than 1,500 contributors, the High Line Flickr Pool gathers some of the best photographs of the park. The images are displayed in a rotating gallery on our Web site, giving High Line fans from afar, or those stuck in the office, a great way to keep track of park life. On the blog, we like to recognize the talented photographers who share their unique perspectives of the park.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Hyemi Cho’s portraits peek out of the windows of neighboring apartment buildings and playfully engage High Line visitors. Photo by Meg Kinney.
 

High Line visitors are often surprised to see smiling faces gazing back at them, and even waving, from the windows of neighboring buildings toward the northern terminus of the park. After the initial double-take, it’s easy to realize that these amusing locals are not flesh-and-blood people, but rather a playful ruse.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
This particular cultivar of witch hazel blooms in the winter when most other plants are dormant.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Categories: 


What is going on in this video?

You might think the light show is part of a public art installation or ambiance for a dance party, but this is what it looks like in the moments before a black-out on the High Line.

Managing one mile of park built on an elevated freight rail line presents unique operational challenges. Like any building in the city, the High Line has millions of dollars worth of mechanical systems – lighting and electrical infrastructure, plumbing and irrigation, and more – and it’s all connected to the city’s utility lines. When the power supply is cut nearby, it can affect the lighting system at the High Line.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The first snowfall of the year was an opportunity to take some great photos of the High Line. Photo by Joan Garvin
 

The first winter storm arrived in New York City on Saturday, blanketing the High Line with a light coating of snow. Our maintenance and operations staff arrived before dawn to begin clearing the pathways, making the park safe for visitors to enjoy the High Line’s winter landscape.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Present throughout the park, ‘The Blues’ little bluestem is a wispy grass that produces fluffy silver seed heads that remain beautiful through the winter months.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
On the Falcone Flyover, visitors can walk through lush foliage at canopy-level during the warmer months of the year. Current mulching efforts will mean healthier and more robust plants this upcoming summer. Photo by Iwan Baan
 

We are always looking for unique ways to minimize waste, cultivate sustainable operations, and keep our discarded plant material closer to home. That is why we are excited about a new opportunity for closed-loop recycling with the introduction of our own organic mulch below the Falcone Flyover, on the High Line between West 25th and 26th Streets.

The Falcone Flyover contains an elevated walkway that carries visitors through a canopy of sumac and magnolia trees. Below the pathway, a gently rolling topography creates soil depth to accommodate shrubs and trees, but it is also prone to erosion.

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A new experiment is underway to prevent the erosion and increase the soil’s fertility. Using a test area, the High Line Gardeners recently introduced an application of organic mulch created from discarded plant material from the High Line, with the goal of increasing use of compostable material on-site and reducing the frequency of visits to off-site composting locations in the future.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Image by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and Beyer Blinder Belle
 

High Line visitors will have a new place to share a meal next year.

Friends of the High Line is now seeking an operator to run a new full-service, year-round restaurant to open directly below the High Line at Gansevoort and Washington Streets in October, 2013.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Joel Sternfeld’s early photographs take us back in time to the 1970s and 1980s, giving us a glimpse of the people, spaces, and style that helped define the era. Taken at a shopping mall, this photograph, titled New Jersey, (#26), May/June 1980, is part of a collection on view at Luhring Augustine, New York. Photo courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York.
 

Many know Joel Sternfeld as the photographer behind the now-iconic images of the wild landscape that grew up on the High Line when the trains stopped running in the 1980s. But his portfolio spans four decades, and a broad collection of his first works is now on view at his gallery, Luhring Augustine, New York in Chelsea.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
High Line Gardener Kaspar Wittlinger leads a tool tune-up session for High Line Gardeners and High Line Volunteers. Here he shows the group the proper technique for sharpening a pair of pruning shears.
 

At this time of year, we get this question all the time: “What do the gardeners do in the winter?”

There is noticeably less activity in the planting beds on the High Line in the winter, but our gardeners are just as busy. They take advantage of the lull in the growing season to plan and prepare for the year to come, and they are also called into action to help ensure the park is safe for the public after snow and ice storms. Here’s a little insight into what the High Line Gardeners are up to in the colder months of the year.

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