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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Work is progressing at the site of the future High Line Headquarters. In the foreground, the formwork for the pile caps and grade beam are outlined in plywood. Crews will pour concrete into these forms; once the concrete dries, the plywood will be removed. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Stand on the High Line near its southern end, and look to the west toward the Hudson River. You will see a giant construction site covered with steel beams, plywood, backhoes, and other heavy duty equipment. It is all part of the ongoing work to build the new High Line Headquarters and Whitney Museum of American Art.

Follow us after the jump for a construction update and photos.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Corsican hellebore is a hearty evergreen that produces pale green flowers in late winter.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The High Line, looking south from West 23rd Street. Photo by Iwan Baan.
 

In case you missed it, last month Travel + Leisure named the High Line as No. 10 on its list of the world’s most popular landmarks.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Family Feather Flurry brought together nearly 40 children and their caregivers for a winter scavenger hunt on the High Line, followed by crafts and storytelling at Posman Books.
 

On Sunday, February 5, children and caregivers joined us for the Family Feather Flurry, a High Line Kids scavenger hunt that explored the High Line’s winter landscape from a bird’s perspective. Following clues about the High Line’s unique plants and flowers, families made their way toward West 16th Street. From there everyone headed to the program’s next stop, Posman Books in Chelsea Market, to decorate their bird puppets and listen to stories.

Enjoy photos from the event and download the High Line scavenger hunt for your kids after the jump.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The woodland crocus is one of the first spring bulbs to pop up. Keep an eye out for these tiny purple flowers. Photo by Cristina Macaya.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Celluloid Strip

Happy Valentine’s Day from Friends of the High Line!

In honor of the romantic holiday, here’s a celluloid strip of lipstick kisses from Jennifer West’s silent film currently looping on HIGH LINE CHANNEL.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
We need your help cutting back the High Line's plants to make way for new spring growth. Submit your volunteer application by Monday, February 13. Photo (upper right) by Joan Garvin. Other photos by Friends of the High Line.
 

The first signs of spring are already popping up along the High Line. To make way for new growth, we are now turning our attention to the biggest horticultural undertaking of the year: High Line Green-Up Spring Cutback.

Beginning in March, the High Line Gardeners will be working quickly to sheer back the grasses and perennials by hand, using pruners, scissors, and the help of volunteers and staff.

Spring Cutback is a monumental task – one that took us 1,200 hours to complete last year. This year, we have twice as much work to do. The High Line doubled in length when the new section opened last June, giving us one mile of parkland with more than 100,000 plants to prepare for spring this year.

We can’t do it without the help of volunteers like you. We hope you will join us!

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Pussy willows are named for their soft cat fur-like blooms that herald spring.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
A rendering imagines how the abandoned Jersey City railway could be converted into public space. Image by Roman Pohorecki.
 

Community members in Jersey City are celebrating a step forward toward the preservation of an elevated freight way similar to the High Line. Last Friday, a Federal appeals court ruled that the city and several nonprofit groups do indeed have standing to pursue their contention that Conrail prematurely sold the property for development before obtaining required rail abandonment permission. Federal rail abandonment law provides historic and environmental protections for the public, as well as opportunities for the City to purchase the property at a reasonable price. The decision paves the way for converting the Embankment into public space.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Pallida witch hazel produces vibrant yellow flowers early in the year. Photo by Joan Garvin.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took root on the elevated rail tracks after the trains stopped running. The High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our Gardeners’ current favorites.

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