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Author: 
Kate Lindquist
The great Ada Louise Huxtable, standard setter for architecture criticism as we know it. Photo by Gene Maggio, via The New York Times
 

Author: 
Erika Harvey
30th StreetA December scene in the 10th Avenue Square, as seen from below. Photo by Alan Greig
 

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
30th StreetThe transformation of the High Line’s final section into public open space has begun. Within the grey containment tent at West 30th Street, construction workers are cleaning and painting the High Line’s steel structure, one of the first tasks to prepare the site for waterproofing and landscaping. Photo by Timothy Schenck
 

Site preparation is underway on the third and final section of the High Line. Construction crews are working through the cold winter temperatures to clean and paint the High Line’s railing, steel beams, girders, and columns.

Follow us after the jump for photos and more details.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Wintersweet blooms are produced on older growth, and High this season marks the first flowering at the park.
 

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

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