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Author: 
Erika Harvey
This native sedge displays subtle fluffy blooms this time of year

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
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This week we bid farewell to talented High Line Photographer David Wilkinson, who is moving back to London.

Over the past few seasons, David has worked with Friends of the High Line to capture stunning images of the park’s plants, artworks, and visitors. You may remember a recent Photo of the Week featuring David’s cheery photograph of spring crocus emerging.

See more of David’s photos of the High Line and New York City.

David will be greatly missed, but we look forward to seeing him turn his lens to subjects across the pond.







Author: 
Erika Harvey
The flowers of Whitespire gray birch come in the form of “catkins,” long cylindrical compound flowers that bloom in the spring.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
#GetBusted ContestYou can nominate and vote for a person who you would like to see commemorated in a sculpture on the High Line.

How would you like to see a sculpture of your favorite person grace the High Line?

For thousands of years, people have been erecting monuments of public figures in parks. Isn’t it time that you had a say in who was up there?

As part of Busted, High Line Art’s group exhibition of ten sculptures, we will be commissioning and producing a new work of art chosen by you—the public.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
High Line staffer Sarah enjoys a treat from High Line Food vendor La Newyorkina. Photo by Jenna Saraco

Today we celebrated the mouth-watering reopening of High Line Food!

It’s exciting to see returning and new vendors’ carts bustling with activity as delicious tacos, BBQ, gelato, popsicles, pretzels, and more are served up to hungry visitors. You may even catch some Friends of the High Line staff frequenting their lunchtime—and “ice-cream sandwich break”-time—favorites.

Plan your next lunch break on the High Line, and stop by between Little West 12th and West 16th Streets to discover our new lineup. Tweet your experience or share photos of High Line Food on Instagram by tagging @highlinenyc and #shareameal.

Read more about the 2013 High Line Food vendors.

Author: 
Ashley Tickle
Frank Benson, Human Statue (Jessie), 2011. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Spring has sprung and with it, new sculptures are sprouting up and down the High Line. Today is the first day High Line Art’s newest HIGH LINE COMMISSION, Busted, a thoughtful and often humorous group exhibition addressing the very nature of public art and monument.

Learn more about Busted after the jump.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
SoulCycle on the High LineMaster instructor Laurie Cole gets cyclists’ heart pumping beneath the blue lighting of the Chelsea Market Passage at West 16th Street. Photo by Liz Ligon

One hundred cyclists took part in a “cardio party” on the High Line last Thursday night, enjoying special a SoulCycle ride to benefit Friends of the High Line. In addition to gleaming rows of custom stationary bikes, SoulCycle set the mood for an inspirational workout with music by DJ Journey.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
The High Line’s spring landscape is characterized by bunches of colorful spring bulbs, like Hawera daffodils.The High Line’s spring landscape is characterized by bunches of colorful spring bulbs, like Hawera daffodils.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
High Line Merchandise CartThe High Line’s commitment to innovative design and sustainability is reflected in each of our items. Photo by Sari Goodfriend

Now you can get those cool magnets you’ve been eyeing without having to spring for shipping. Boasting an array of new items, the High Line Shop Carts will reopen Tuesday, April 16th, at West 16th Street. We’ve extended our hours, so you can browse our postcards, tee-shirts, and other distinctive merchandise six days a week—Tuesday through Sunday, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

EnlargePaula Scher High Line Map PosterPaula Scher High Line Map Poster

Your purchase directly supports the maintenance and operation of the High Line, so each time you carry your DVF High Line Logo Tote or wear your Logo Tee, you’ll look awesome and altruistic. Adore the Paula Scher High Line Map Poster but lack the extra room in your suitcase to carry it home? Never fear—we are now able to ship your cart purchase to any domestic or international address.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
View looking east, at 11th Avenue and West 30th Street. Before and after on the High Line at the Rail Yards. Along the straightaway between 10th and 11th Avenues, the self-seeded landscape is being removed to make way for the park’s new design features, but it will remain untouched on the western stretch of the site. There, crews will build a simple path, called the Interim Walkway, to let visitors experience the original wildscape. Photos by Timothy Schenck

Site preparation took a major step forward this month, when crews began removing soil, ballast, tracks, and debris from the High Line’s concrete deck.

Follow us after the jump to learn more and view the latest photos.

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