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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Stop by to enjoy the white flowers of this woodland succulent, native to the eastern United States, this time of year.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Goshka Macuga, Colin Powell, 2009. Part of Busted, a HIGH LINE COMMISSION. On view April 2013 – April 2014 on the High Line, New York. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

We’re excited to bring you a fantastic spring season of art on the High Line, with new commissions, installations, and video screenings by acclaimed artists. Our overview of what’s on view takes you northward, from Gansevoort Street to the High Line at the Rail Yards.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Visitors walk along the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover as the pathway ramps up just north of West 25th Street.
Photo by Karen Blumberg

High Line Photographer Karen Blumberg captured this lush springtime shot last week of the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover, the elevated walkway on the High Line between West 25th and West 27th Streets.

The Falcone Flyover is a subtle design feature that complements the natural microclimate found in this stretch of the park. North of West 25th Street, visitors find that the historic warehouse buildings draw closer to the historic railway, protecting this section from the wind and creating a naturally shady environment that captures moisture. When Joel Sternfeld photographed this area in the year 2000, it was home to tall sumacs and a thick understory.

When the High Line Design Team of James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Piet Oudolf turned their attention to this area of the High Line, they looked to work with and celebrate the natural microclimate created by the close proximity of buildings when creating the design for the park.

Now, along the Falcone Flyover, a pathway ramps up gently to a height of eight feet above the ground, carrying visitors through a canopy of magnolias, sassafras, and serviceberry trees. This time of year, spring blooms like Solomon’s seal, red baneberry, a variety of phlox, and vibrant green mosses cover the forest floor, and the canopy is growing thicker with trees’ leaves.

Take your time while walking the Falcone Flyover next time you're at the High Line to enjoy seasonal foliage and blooms.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Between West 25th and West 27th Streets, the Philip A. and Lisa Maria Falcone Flyover rises over a variety of shade-loving plants, like Solomon’s seal.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees — each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
West 16th Street, 1950s. Photo by Ed DoyleTaken in the 1950s, this photograph shows a passenger car at West 16th Street. Around the same time this image was captured, construction was underway on the interstate highway system, which would lead to further decline in freight traffic to and from New York City. Photo by Ed Doyle
 

This special blog post, the second in a two-part series (see part one), was written by Sonya Kharas of the NYU Food Studies Program and Nutshell Projects.

Feeding the Future

A slow, inefficient, and costly transportation system was incongruous with New York City in the 1920s. After all, this was the city that completed two of the world’s tallest skyscrapers — the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings — within the same year, and the city about which F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote, “Everything is possible. I am in the land of ambition, and success.”

And so, in 1929, the City of New York and the New York Central Railroad Company embarked on an ambitious project that would elevate the grade-level tracks along Manhattan’s West Side and, more importantly, modernize the handling of the city’s daily supplies of foodstuffs.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
As the city's population grew, congestion caused by a mix of pedestrians, motorized traffic, and street-level freight trains slowed food delivery into New York City. Photo courtesy of the Kalmbach Publishing Company
 

This special blog post, the first in a two-part series (see part two), was written by Sonya Kharas of the NYU Food Studies Program and Nutshell Projects.

Last fall, Friends of the High Line announced plans to open a year-round, full-service restaurant directly below the elevated railway’s southern terminus, at Gansevoort and Washington Streets. The restaurant, to be operated by the team behind Torrisi Italian Specialties and Parm, will serve breakfast, lunch, dinner, and, as it turns out, provide a perfect starting point to consider the historic role that the High Line has played in feeding New York City.

A Historic Marketplace

Decades ago, the site of the High Line’s forthcoming restaurant was home to one of the city’s most important municipal markets: the open-air Farmers’ Market, later Gansevoort Market, for regional produce. Established in 1879, the market was devoted almost entirely to the sale of fruits and vegetables, the majority of which arrived by horse-drawn wagon from nearby farms in Long Island, Staten Island, New Jersey, and Westchester.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
Work continues on High Line Headquarters and the future location of the Whitney Museum of American Art as lush spring foliage pops up along the southern end of the High Line. Photo by Timothy Schenck

Crews are busy installing the interior finishes to High Line Headquarters, a four-story building located next to the new downtown location of the Whitney Museum of American Art, which is also under construction.

Designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop in collaboration with Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, High Line Headquarters will serve as a critical gathering space for visitors, with a new elevator, public restrooms, and a public meeting room when it opens later this year.

The building will also help keep the High Line’s landscape thriving, by giving gardeners, custodians, and maintenance technicians direct access between storage facilities and the park. This will streamline the transfer of materials, vehicles, and equipment -- one of the current challenges of maintaining a park elevated 30 feet above the street.

Stay up to date on the construction of High Line Headquarters by signing up the High Line E-News.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Staff Members Wearing DVF High Line Items(Left) Wrapped in DVF’s High Line Scarf, High Line Community Engagement Manager Erycka Montoya Pérez takes in the cityscape. (Right) Executive Projects Manager AV Goodsell uses DVF’s High Line Tote to carry her items around NYC. Photos by Liz Ligon

This Mother’s Day, give mom something she’ll love and support the High Line with the Diane von Furstenberg limited-edition High Line collection. Designed exclusively for Friends of the High Line, these sleek accessories and supplies are available only on the High Line and at our web shop. With prices ranging from $10 to $85, you can swathe your mom in DVF without breaking the bank.

Decorated with a bright-green heart motif, our DVF High Line Tote is chic and roomy—perfect for a trip to the farmer’s market. And because it’s made of high-quality coated canvas, this carry-all will continue to look new long after May 12. Present it to mom with some goodies inside, like our cute DVF notebooks and magnets.

Author: 
Kate Lindquist
Sweet Leaf Tea on the High LineFind your #SweetActs on Friday, May 17, with Sweet Leaf® Tea at the Chelsea Market Passage.

Give someone a seat on the subway. Send a friend a handwritten note. Start an urban garden.

Stop by the High Line to plan your sweet act for the day. Take part in an interactive installation presented by Sweet Leaf® Tea, and enjoy free drinks and goodies as you take in the views from the High Line.

Follow us after the jump for details.

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