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Author: 
Adam Dooling
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe flowers of the azure blue sage, Salvia azurea, will bloom until early frost. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share with you one of our gardeners’ current favorites.

Author: 
Jennette Mullaney
Photo by Steven SeveringhausThose eyes! Gilbert & George's Waking keeps a close watch on the High Line. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

Waking (1984), the prismatic High Line Billboard by artists Gilbert & George, draws the eye like a magnet. However, unlike most billboards vying for your gaze on any given day in New York City, this one gazes back.

Such a captivating work of art was bound to inspire photographers, and Waking began to appear frequently in our Flickr pool. We found these shots by Steven Severinghaus particularly striking.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Andrew Frasz's image of El Anatsui's Broken Bridge II on the High Line Photographer Andrew Frasz 's image of El Anatsui’s Broken Bridge II captures the majesty of this work on a brilliant morning. The piece is installed between West 21 and 22 Streets on the High Line and is on view until September 30.

Brooklyn-based High Line Photographer Andrew Frasz perfectly captured the brilliant color and detail of High Line Art installation Broken Bridge II in the context of the High Line. His images of the park on this early morning speak to the precision and skill he brings to his craft, and when looking through his work one can clearly see his knack for representing spaces in a clear, beautiful way. See the rest of Andrew’s images from that morning here.

Read more after the break.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargePhoto by Friends of the High Line

At the southern end of the 14th Street Passage an out-of-place tree sways in the September breeze, attracting the attention of park visitors as they pass. With its tall, nearly 18-foot stature, full head of verdant fronds, and slender bare trunk, this tree looks as if it’d be more at home along a white-sand beach than among the soft textures and warm colors of the High Line’s fall landscape.

This curious tropical visitor is Adonidia merrillii, also known colloquially as the “Christmas Palm.” It earned this nickname because its fruit turns a bright scarlet color in winter. Don’t be fooled, however, about its cold-hardiness. While the trees are well-adapted to living to habitats outside their native Philippines, you won’t find it north of the southernmost reaches of Florida.

So, then, what brought this tropical palm to a four-season park like the High Line? Keep reading to find out.

Author: 
Erika Harvey


The My High Line video series highlights the many uses of the High Line and the people who call it their own.

In this installment, meet Neftaly Garcia, a promising young educator who has worked in many capacities on the High Line’s public programs.

Join us after the jump to discover her High Line.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Four photographs of the High Line by Tim SchreierNew York photographer, Tim Schreier composes his frames with geometry, color, and texture in mind.

Photographer Tim Schreier's striking photos caught our eye in the High Line Flickr Pool. His images transform everyday surfaces into painterly compositions that harness light and pattern. Often a single element in the frame breaks up the repetition, adding context and depth to what might otherwise be a simple texture. Tim’s photos of the High Line bring a refreshing new perspective on park life. We couldn’t decide which image we liked best, so we’ve created a grid of four of our favorite textural High Line images from Tim's recent work.

All of this bold color reminds us of the beautiful fall hues to come. As the High Line’s landscape transitions into the new season, we will soon be surrounded by the vibrant oranges, fiery reds, and cool yellows of autumn. The visual opportunities are rich, so grab your camera and come take some photos on the High Line.

See other visitors’ photos or share your own in the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Friends of the High Line A group of High Line staff members enjoy the breeze and panoramic view from the top of a hill in Freshkills Park on Staten Island. Come learn more about the park at our free talk on September 23, Beyond the High Line: Transforming Fresh Kills, Staten Island . And visit Freshkills itself on September 29 for Sneak Peak! Photo by Friends of the High Line

On Tuesday, September 10, twelve members of the High Line staff took a trip to tour Freshkills Park in Staten Island, built on the former site of the world’s largest landfill. With 2,200 acres, the park is almost three times larger than Central Park.

Freshkills is divided into five sections, most of which are not yet open to the public. However, we were given the opportunity to look behind the scenes (and up the hills and in the meadows) with Michael Callery, one of the stewards of this amazing reclaimed site.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
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Photo by Bryan Hou Photo by Bryan Hou

Fall is one our favorite seasons on the High Line – golden brown leaves, frosty morning walks, and school children enjoying nature after classes have let out. The High Line Shop has new apparel inspired by this peak of natural splendor. Follow us after the jump for a first look at new tees and accessories.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
Photo by Rowa Lee David Carrell, co-founder of People's Pops, teaches children how to freeze their own pops using a rare pop-making instrument from Thailand. Photo by Rowa Lee

Good friends Nathalie Jordi, Joel Horowitz, and David Carrell founded People’s Pops with the idea that every good popsicle is made with local, seasonal fruit, minimal sugar, and creative flavors. Taking inspiration from unique teas, cocktails, and world travels, People’s Pops was born. These delicious pops are especially popular among kids, which is why our annual Play With Your Food events welcome many giddy kids eager to make and eat pops of their own.

Author: 
Ana Nicole Rodriguez
A Blue Bottle Coffee employee holds up roasted beans. Photo by Friends of the High Line
 

Holding ourselves to a higher standard is essential here at the High Line, and this commitment is reflected in the food and drink we serve on the park. This week, we headed into Brooklyn to Blue Bottle Coffee’s roastery to bring you a first look at how we source and roast our beans and train baristas to develop their coffee palates – all so we can serve a remarkably good cup of coffee to our visitors on the High Line.

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