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Author: 
Erika Harvey
Photo by Gigi AltarejosDried grasses, bare branches, and a light blanket of snow epitomize winter beauty in the High Line’s gardens. Photo by Gigi Altarejos

It may only be the end of January, but many New Yorkers are already looking for signs that the icy grip of winter is loosening. While some in the nation will be celebrating the beginning of Chinese New Year and rooting for their favorite teams, others of us will be watching attentively as Punxsutawney Phil, the country’s most famous weather-prognosticating groundhog, makes his prediction about the coming of spring.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Steven SeveringhausA mockingbird enjoys the "berries" – actually cones – of one of the High Line's Emerald Sentinel® Eastern red cedar trees. Photo by Steven Severinghaus

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Mike TschappatHigh Line Photographer Mike Tschappat captured an interesting view of the High Line with visitors and Chelsea Piers in the background, silhouetted against a warm end-of-the-day sky.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Friends of the High LineAfter a January snowstorm, the leaves of Green Shadow sweetbay magnolia remain vibrant. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Timothy SchenckOur newest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood, photographed by Timothy Schenck

High Line Photographer Timothy Schenck perfectly captured our latest High Line Billboard, Shelf Still Life by Jonas Wood in an aerial image, allowing us to see how this monumental work of art appears at a distance. The lofty viewpoint showcases the scale of the billboard in relation to the High Line, as well as how the work's bright colors interact with the muted shades of the winter landscape. Schenck has taken photographs of High Line Art's projects for years, and his documentation of the program's sculptures, billboards, and other works of art allows us to appreciate them in a whole new way.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe elegant gray birch can be found growing throughout the High Line. Photo by Friends of the High Line.

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photo by Vadim KrisyanPhotographer Vadim Krisyan captures the High Line beautifully in black and white. A limited palate highlights Ulla von Brandenburg’s Shadowplay on view daily beginning at 4:00 PM on High Line Channel 14 located in the 14th Street Passage on the High Line.

In this age of highly saturated, full-color imagery, it is refreshing to see the timeless, muted tones of a monochrome image. The starkness of winter lends itself to shades of gray. By using black-and-white, Vadim Krisyan focuses his viewers on shape, light, and subject. Undistracted by color, the eye can take in a scene in a wholly different way. This is especially appropriate when looking at an image of von Brandenburg’s video installation, Shadowplay.

See more of Krisyan’s images of the High Line here, all poetically simplified by the use of a black-and-white lens.

View more of the beautiful work of other visitors and High Line Photographers – and share your own – in the High Line Flickr Pool.

Author: 
John Gunderson
Photo by Friends of the High LineThe staghorn sumac, Rhus typhina, is particularly striking during the colder months. Photo by Friends of the High Line

The High Line’s planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew up between rail tracks after the trains stopped running in the 1980s. Today, the High Line includes more than 300 species of perennials, grasses, shrubs, and trees – each chosen for their hardiness, adaptability, diversity, and seasonal variation in color and texture. Some of the species that originally grew on the High Line’s rail bed are reflected in the park landscape today.

This week we share one of our gardeners’ current favorites with you.

Author: 
Amelia Krales
Photos by Juan Valentin The seed heads of plants past their prime are beautiful in their winter state. The High Line’s perennials are intentionally left by our gardeners to overwinter naturally, and won’t be cut back until spring. Photos by Juan Valentin

The landscape design of the High Line is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that took over during the decades after the last train rumbled by in 1980. Planting designer Piet Oudolf’s design concept for the High Line selects shrubs, trees, flowers, and grasses for their four-season interest, color, and texture. This time of year, you’ll notice an important aspect of Piet’s four-season vision: stiff stalks, architectural seed heads, and dried grasses create beauty and interest in the winter garden.

In these three elegant images High Line Photographer Juan Valentin singled out beautiful examples of plants that have gone to seed and photographed them portrait-style. From left to right, smooth sumac, Rhus glabra, swamp rose mallow, Hibiscus moscheutos ssp. palustris, and Hydrangea paniculata 'Limelight,' have lost their bold hues but are striking in their winter incarnations.

Winter hours on the High Line are 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM, but stay tuned to @highlinenyc on Twitter during inclement weather for updates.

Author: 
Erika Harvey
EnlargeLongtime High Line Photographer Marcin Wichary chanced upon this poetic early morning scene in the winter of 2010.

In celebration of the High Line Calendar, we’re exploring each month’s featured image to bring you more of the behind-the-scenes details.

This month’s image comes from longtime High Line Photographer Marcin Wichary. Marcin may call San Francisco home, but the course of his development as a photographer can be charted via almost-yearly visits to the High Line. Beginning in 2007 with a newly purchased DSLR and continuing through the present, Marcin has developed his photo skills while focusing his lens on the development and growth of the park.

It was during a short stint in New York in the winter of 2010 that Marcin captured this month’s mesmerizing image. Awaking in the morning to find fluffy snowflakes falling along the mile-long park was a welcome change of scenery for Marcin. As he was rushing to get out the door to document the snowfall, he spotted this scene almost serendipitously.

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